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Manipulation Through Bribes

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  • James Schummer

Abstract

We consider allocation rules that choose both a public outcome and transfers, based on the agents' reported valuations of the outcomes. Under a given allocation rule, a bribing situation exists when one agent could pay another to misreport his valuations, resulting in a net gain to both agents. A rule is bribe-proof if such opportunities never arise (including the case in which the briber and bribee are the same agent). The central result is that under a bribe-proof rule, regardless of the domain of admissible valuations, the payoff to any one agent is a continuous function of any other agent's reported valuations. We then show that on connected domains of valuation functions, if either the set of outcomes is finite or each agent's set of admissible valuations is smoothly connected, then an agent's payoff is a constant function of other agents' reported valuations. Finally, under the additional assumption of a standard richness condition on the set of admissible valuations, a bribe-proof rule must be a constant function.

Suggested Citation

  • James Schummer, 1997. "Manipulation Through Bribes," Discussion Papers 1207, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:nwu:cmsems:1207
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:gamebe:v:103:y:2017:i:c:p:83-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. William Thomson, 2016. "Non-bossiness," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 47(3), pages 665-696, October.
    3. Ju, Biung-Ghi, 2013. "Coalitional manipulation on networks," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(2), pages 627-662.
    4. repec:spr:sochwe:v:49:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00355-017-1068-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Fujinaka, Yuji & Wakayama, Takuma, 2008. "Secure implementation in economies with indivisible objects and money," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(1), pages 91-95, July.
    6. Penna, Paolo & Ventre, Carmine, 2014. "Optimal collusion-resistant mechanisms with verification," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 491-509.
    7. Andersson, Tommy & Svensson, Lars-Gunnar, 2016. "Strategy-proof house allocation with price restrictions," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 167-177.
    8. Shigehiro Serizawa, 2006. "Pairwise Strategy-Proofness and Self-Enforcing Manipulation," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 26(2), pages 305-331, April.
    9. Salvador Barberà & Dolors Berga & Bernardo Moreno, 2016. "Group Strategy-Proofness in Private Good Economies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(4), pages 1073-1099, April.
    10. Chen, Jing & Micali, Silvio, 2012. "Collusive dominant-strategy truthfulness," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(3), pages 1300-1312.
    11. Juarez, Ruben, 2013. "Group strategyproof cost sharing: The role of indifferences," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 218-239.
    12. Masso, Jordi & Neme, Alejandro, 2007. "Bribe-proof rules in the division problem," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 331-343, November.
    13. Joseph Ostroy & Uzi Segal, 2012. "No externalities: a characterization of efficiency and incentive compatibility with public goods," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 39(4), pages 697-719, October.
    14. Jing Chen & Silvio Micali, 2016. "Leveraging Possibilistic Beliefs in Unrestricted Combinatorial Auctions," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(4), pages 1-19, October.
    15. Salvador Barberà, 2010. "Strategy-proof social choice," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 828.10, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    16. Sato, Shin, 2013. "A sufficient condition for the equivalence of strategy-proofness and nonmanipulability by preferences adjacent to the sincere one," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(1), pages 259-278.
    17. Olga Gorelkina, 2014. "Bidder Collusion and the Auction with Target Bids," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2014_10, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    18. Eso, Peter & Schummer, James, 2004. "Bribing and signaling in second price auctions," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 299-324, May.
    19. Fiestras-Janeiro, Gloria & Klijn, Flip & Sanchez, Estela, 2004. "Manipulation of optimal matchings via predonation of endowment," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 295-312, May.
    20. Nanyang Bu, 2016. "Joint misrepresentation with bribes," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 61(1), pages 115-125, January.
    21. Sertel, Murat R. & Ozkal-Sanver, Ipek, 2002. "Manipulability of the men- (women-) optimal matching rule via endowments," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 65-83, September.
    22. Agustín Bonifacio, 2015. "Bribe-proof reallocation with single-peaked preferences," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 44(3), pages 617-638, March.
    23. Nanyang Bu, 2016. "Joint misrepresentation with bribes," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 61(1), pages 115-125, January.
    24. repec:eee:jetheo:v:170:y:2017:i:c:p:29-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Mizukami, Hideki & Wakayama, Takuma, 2009. "The relation between non-bossiness and monotonicity," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 256-264, September.

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