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Parental Income and Risk Behaviour as Determinants of Adolescent Health

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  • Ivar Pettersen

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

Abstract

The relationship between health and income among adults is well established. Adolescent health and parental income has not received the same attention. In this study we look at household income both as a direct determinant of adolescent health and as an important factor in relation to behavioural patterns among adolescents. The data used is from two surveys conducted in a Norwegian county (n=9 000, which accounts for 90 % of the age-group 13-19 in a Norwegian county). The results indicate that income works partly through some health-promoting behaviours but, still has a significant direct effect on adolescent health. We also find that high household-income does not cushion the effect of health-deteriorating behaviour, but it strengthens the probability that adolescents take part in physical activity. Household income is important in terms of increasing the probability that adolescents actively participate in sports and physical activity in general.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivar Pettersen, 2009. "Parental Income and Risk Behaviour as Determinants of Adolescent Health," Working Paper Series 10709, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:10709
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    File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2009/10_WP_paper_UH_IP.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Instrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and Demand to Natural Experiments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 69-85, Fall.
    2. Aughinbaugh, Alison & Gittleman, Maury, 2004. "Maternal employment and adolescent risky behavior," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 815-838, July.
    3. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
    4. repec:fth:prinin:455 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Joshua Angrist & Alan Krueger, 2001. "Instrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and Demand to Natural Experiments," Working Papers 834, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
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