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Why International Equity Inflows to Emerging Markets are Inefficient and Small Relative to International Debt Flows

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  • Assaf Razin
  • Efraim Sadka
  • Chi-Wa Yuen

Abstract

This paper considers the financing of investment in the presence of asymmetric information between the 'insiders' and the 'outsiders' of the firms in a small open economy. It establishes a well-defined capital structure for the economy as a whole with the following features: low-productivity firms rely on the equity market to finance investment at a relatively low level; medium-productivity firms do not invest at all; and high-productivity firms rely on the debt market to finance investment at a relatively high level. It is shown that the debt market is efficient, with respect to both its scope and the amount of investment that each firm makes. However, the equity market fails: its scope is too narrow and the investment each firm makes is too little. A corrective policy requires just one instrument which is rather unconventional: lump-sum subsidies to those firms that choose to equity-finance their investment (i.e., equity-market-contingent grants).

Suggested Citation

  • Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka & Chi-Wa Yuen, 2001. "Why International Equity Inflows to Emerging Markets are Inefficient and Small Relative to International Debt Flows," NBER Working Papers 8659, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8659
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gordon, Roger H & Bovenberg, A Lans, 1996. "Why Is Capital So Immobile Internationally? Possible Explanations and Implications for Capital Income Taxation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1057-1075, December.
    2. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicholas S., 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 187-221, June.
    3. Jonathan Eaton & Mark Gersovitz, 1987. "Country Risk and the Organization of International Capital Transfer," NBER Working Papers 2204, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Razin, A. & Sadka, E. & Yuen, C.W., 1997. "Chanelling Domestic Saving into Productive Investment Under Asymmetric Information: The Essential Role of Foreign Direct Investment," Papers 36-97, Tel Aviv.
    5. Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka & Chi-Wa Yuen, 1997. "Channeling Domestic Savings into Productive Investment Under Asymmetric Information: The Essential Role of Foreign Direct Investment," NBER Working Papers 6338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gertler, Mark & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1990. "North-South lending and endogenous domestic capital market inefficiencies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 245-266, October.
    7. Lane, Philip R, 1999. "North-South Lending with Moral Hazard and Repudiation Risk," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(1), pages 50-58, February.
    8. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicolás S., 1945-, 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Working papers 1523-84., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    9. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
    10. Zhaohui Chen & Mohsin S. Khan, 1997. "Patterns of Capital Flows to Emerging Markets; A Theoretical Perspective," IMF Working Papers 97/13, International Monetary Fund.
    11. George A. Akerlof, 1970. "The Market for "Lemons": Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(3), pages 488-500.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Loof, Hans, 2004. "Dynamic optimal capital structure and technical change," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 449-468, December.
    2. Lööf, Hans, 2003. "Dynamic Optimal Capital Structure and Technological Change," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-06, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Shang-Jin Wei, 2004. "Managing Macroeconomic Crises," NBER Working Papers 10907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Bélyácz, Iván & Kuti, Mónika, 2009. "Külföldi működőtőke és külső eladósodás. Kísérlet a makrogazdasági tőkestruktúra új szempontú vizsgálatára
      [Foreign operating capital and foreign indebtedness. An attempt to examine macroeconomic c
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 133-154.
    5. Dell'Erba, Salvatore & Reinhardt, Dennis, 2015. "FDI, debt and capital controls," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 29-50.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid

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