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Beyond Ricardo: Assignment Models in International Trade

Author

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  • Arnaud Costinot
  • Jonathan Vogel

Abstract

International trade has experienced a Ricardian revival. In this article, we offer a user guide to assignment models, which we will refer to as Ricardo-Roy (R-R) models, that have contributed to this revival.

Suggested Citation

  • Arnaud Costinot & Jonathan Vogel, 2014. "Beyond Ricardo: Assignment Models in International Trade," NBER Working Papers 20585, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20585
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heckman, James J & Honore, Bo E, 1990. "The Empirical Content of the Roy Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(5), pages 1121-1149, September.
    2. Monte, Ferdinando, 2011. "Skill bias, trade, and wage dispersion," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 202-218, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:deveco:v:135:y:2018:i:c:p:77-84 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cebreros Zurita Carlos Alfonso, 2018. "Labor Heterogeneity and the Pattern of Trade," Working Papers 2018-01, Banco de México.
    3. William R Kerr, 2018. "Heterogeneous Technology Diffusion and Ricardian Trade Patterns," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 32(1), pages 163-182.
    4. Lee, Eunhee & Yi, Kei-Mu, 2018. "Global value chains and inequality with endogenous labor supply," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 223-241.
    5. Shushanik Hakobyan & John McLaren, 2017. "NAFTA and the Gender Wage Gap," NBER Chapters,in: Trade and Labor Markets National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Thibault Fally & Benjamin Faber, 2016. "Firm Heterogeneity in Consumption Baskets: Evidence from Home and Store Scanner Data," 2016 Meeting Papers 381, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Sebastian Sotelo, 2015. "Domestic Trade Frictions and Agriculture," Working Papers 641, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
    8. repec:ces:ifosdt:v:70:y:2017:i:09:p:03-18 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Sampson, Thomas, 2016. "Assignment reversals: Trade, skill allocation and wage inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 365-409.
    10. Stark, Oded & Zawojska, Ewa & Kohler, Wilhelm & Szczygielski, Krzysztof, 2018. "An adverse social welfare effect of a doubly gainful trade," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 77-84.
    11. David J. Deming, 2015. "The Growing Importance of Social Skills in the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 21473, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Matsuyama, Kiminori, 2017. "Engel's Law in the Global Economy: Demand-induced Patterns of Structural Change, Innovation, and Trade," CEPR Discussion Papers 12387, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade

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