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Do Firms Go Public to Raise Capital?

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  • Woojin Kim
  • Michael Weisbach

Abstract

This paper considers the question of whether raising capital is an important reason why firms go public. Using a sample of 16,958 initial public offerings from 38 countries between 1990 and 2003, we consider differences between firms that sell new, primary shares to the public, and existing secondary shares that previously belonged to insiders. Our results suggest that the sale of primary shares is correlated with a number of factors associated with the firm's demand for capital. In particular, issuance of primary shares is correlated with higher increases of investment, higher repayment of debt and increases in cash, and more subsequent capital-raising through seasoned equity offers. Since 79% of all capital raised through IPOs in our sample is from the sale of primary shares, we conclude that capital-raising is an important motive in the going-public decision.

Suggested Citation

  • Woojin Kim & Michael Weisbach, 2005. "Do Firms Go Public to Raise Capital?," NBER Working Papers 11197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11197 Note: CF
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marco Pagano & Fabio Panetta & and Luigi Zingales, 1998. "Why Do Companies Go Public? An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(1), pages 27-64, February.
    2. Ansgar Belke & Friedrich Schneider, 2003. "Privatization in Austria: Some Theoretical Reasons and First Results About the Privatization Proceeds," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 229/2003, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    3. Ritter, Jay R, 1991. " The Long-run Performance of Initial Public Offerings," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 3-27, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chahine, Salim, 2008. "Underpricing versus gross spread: New evidence on the effect of sold shares at the time of IPOs," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, pages 180-196.
    2. Brau, James C. & Li, Mingsheng & Shi, Jing, 2007. "Do secondary shares in the IPO process have a negative effect on aftermarket performance?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(9), pages 2612-2631, September.
    3. Richard J. Rosen & Scott B. Smart & Chad J. Zutter, 2005. "Why do firms go public? evidence from the banking industry," Working Paper Series WP-05-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    4. Manfred Borchert, "undated". "The Impact of Banking Behaviour on Monetary Strategy in Europe," Working Papers 201160, Institute of Spatial and Housing Economics, Munster Universitary.
    5. Franck Bancel & Usha R. Mittoo, 2013. "Survey evidence: what do we know about European and US firms’ motivations for going public?," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on IPOs, chapter 3, pages 57-75 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Kashefi Pour, Eilnaz & Lasfer, Meziane, 2013. "Why do companies delist voluntarily from the stock market?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 4850-4860.
    7. Mayur, Manas & Kumar, Manoj, 2006. "An Empirical Investigation of Going Public Decision of Indian Companies," MPRA Paper 1801, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Korbinian von Blanckenburg, "undated". "Eine Methode zur Schätzung der Rückkopplungsparameter im Koordinationsmängel-Diagnosekonzept," Working Papers 201151, Institute of Spatial and Housing Economics, Munster Universitary.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance
    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance

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