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Investment Prices and Exchange Rates: Some Basic Facts

  • Ariel Burstein
  • Joao C. Neves
  • Sergio Rebelo

This paper documents four basic facts about investment goods and investment prices. First, investment has a very significant nontradable component in the form of construction services. Second, distributions services (wholesaling, retailing, and transportation) are much less important for investment than for consumption. Third, the import content of investment is much larger than that of consumption. Finally, in the aftermath of three large devaluations, the rate of exchange rate pass-through is, perhaps not surprisingly, highest for imported equipment and lowest for construction services.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w10238.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 10238.

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Date of creation: Jan 2004
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Publication status: published as Ariel T. Burstein & Jo�o C. Neves & Sergio Rebelo, 2004. "Investment Prices and Exchange Rates: Some Basic Facts," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 302-309, 04/05.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10238
Note: EFG IFM
Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
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Web page: http://www.nber.org
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  1. Ariel T. Burstein & Joao C. Neves & Sergio Rebelo, 2000. "Distribution Costs and Real Exchange Rate Dynamics During Exchange-Rate-Based Stabilizations," RCER Working Papers 473, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  2. Ricardo Caballero & Arvind Krishnamurthy, 2000. "International and Domestic Collateral Constraints in a Model of Emerging Market Crises," NBER Working Papers 7971, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Philippe Aghion & Philippe Bacchetta & Abhijit Banerjee, 2004. "Financial Development and the Instability of Open Economies," NBER Working Papers 10246, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Ariel Burstein & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2003. "Why is Inflation so Low after Large Devaluations?," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0308, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  5. Ariel Burstein & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2002. "Why Are Rates of Inflation So Low After Large Devaluations?," NBER Working Papers 8748, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Lawrence J. Christiano & Christopher Gust & Jorge Roldos, 2002. "Monetary policy in a financial crisis," Working Paper 0204, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  7. Jonathan Eaton & Samuel Kortum, 2001. "Trade in Capital Goods," NBER Working Papers 8070, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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