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Modeling Exchange Rate Passthrough After Large Devaluations

  • Burstein, Ariel Tomas
  • Eichenbaum, Martin
  • Rebelo, Sérgio

Large devaluations are generally associated with large declines in real exchange rates. We develop a model which embodies two complementary forces that account for the large declines in the real exchange rate that occur in the aftermath of large devaluations. The first force is sticky nontradable goods prices. The second force is the impact of real shocks that often accompany large devaluations. We argue that sticky nontradable goods prices generally play an important role in explaining post-devaluation movements in real exchange rates. However, real shocks can sometimes be primary drivers of real exchange rate movements.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 5250.

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Date of creation: Sep 2005
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:5250
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