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Do Inflation-Targeting Central Banks Implicitly Target the Price Level?

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  • RUGE-MURCIA, Francisco J.

Abstract

This paper reports graphical and statistical evidence that the inflation targeting regimes in Canada and the UK - but not in Australia, New Zealand, or Sweden - actually resemble price-level targeting. In particular, the price level closely tracks the path implied by the inflation target, and the time-series predictions of the "bygones-are-bygones" version of inflation targeting are rejected by the data in favor of those implied by price-level targeting. These results indicate heterogeneity in the actual application of inflation targeting across countries and, for Canada and the UK, imply that the characterization of inflation targeting as a policy where shocks are accommodated is at odds with the data. Moreover, up to extent that their current policies already resemble price-level targeting, the welfare gains of replacing inflation with (explicit) price-level targeting are likely to be small.

Suggested Citation

  • RUGE-MURCIA, Francisco J., 2009. "Do Inflation-Targeting Central Banks Implicitly Target the Price Level?," Cahiers de recherche 2009-15, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtl:montde:2009-15
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/1866/4000
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Eurilton Araújo & Débora Gouveia, 2013. "Calvo-type rules and the forward-looking behavior of inflation targeting central banks," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 2042-2051.
    2. Pierre L. Siklos, 2011. "Communication for Multi-Taskers: Perspectives on Dealing with Both Monetary Policy and Financial Stability," Working Paper series 04_11, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    3. Carl E. Walshn, 2016. "Goals versus Rules as Central Bank Preformance Measures," Book Chapters, Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
    4. Evzen Kocenda & Balazs Varga, 2016. "The impact of monetary strategies on inflation persistence," KIER Working Papers 938, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    5. Svensson, Lars E O, 2013. "Some Lessons from Six Years of Practical Inflation Targeting," CEPR Discussion Papers 9756, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Baum, Christopher F. & Kurov, Alexander & Wolfe, Marketa Halova, 2015. "What do Chinese macro announcements tell us about the world economy?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 100-122.
    7. Jiri Bohm & Jan Filacek, 2012. "Price-Level Targeting–A Real Alternative to Inflation Targeting?," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 62(1), pages 2-26, February.
    8. Graham M. Voss & M. Chaban, 2012. "National and Provincial Inflation in Canada: Experiences under Inflation Targeting," Department Discussion Papers 1201, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
    9. Andrew Blake & Garreth Rule & Ole Rummel, 2015. "Inflation targeting and term premia estimates for Latin America," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 24(1), pages 1-21, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation-targeting; price-level targeting; unit-root tests;

    JEL classification:

    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit

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