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Stability Price Index, Core Inflation and Output Volatility

Author

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  • Wojciech Charemza
  • Imran Hussain Shah

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between the ‘exclusion’ type core inflation measures and the stability price index. Empirical results for Malaysia and Pakistan suggests that, if targeting core inflation index is to stabilize output, weights of the export-oriented sectors (energy for Malaysia and foodstuffs for Pakistan) should be reduces, in relation to the consumers’ price index weights, and for import-oriented sectors, increased. It also indicates that, in order to maintain real sector stability, central bankers should include the fundamental component of the stock market prices in the price index they target.

Suggested Citation

  • Wojciech Charemza & Imran Hussain Shah, 2012. "Stability Price Index, Core Inflation and Output Volatility," Discussion Papers in Economics 12/21, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:12/21
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2003. "What Measure of Inflation Should a Central Bank Target?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(5), pages 1058-1086, September.
    2. Claudio Morana, 2007. "A structural common factor approach to core inflation estimation and forecasting," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 163-169.
    3. Hyeon-Seung Huh & Hyun-Hoon Lee, 2011. "A combined measure of UK core inflation estimates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(18), pages 2331-2341.
    4. Alberto Humala & Gabriel Rodr�guez, 2012. "A factorial decomposition of inflation in Peru: an alternative measure of core inflation," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(14), pages 1331-1334, September.
    5. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Kim, 2004. "Inflation Targeting, Price-Path Targeting, and Output Variability," NBER Chapters, in: The Inflation-Targeting Debate, pages 173-200, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ricardo Reis, 2005. "A Dynamic Measure of Inflation," NBER Working Papers 11746, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Abdul Aleem & Amine Lahiani, 2011. "Estimation and evaluation of core inflation measures," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(25), pages 3619-3629.
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    Cited by:

    1. Imran Hussain Shaha & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero, 2017. "Seeking price and macroeconomic stabilisation in the euro area: The role of house prices and stock prices," Working Papers del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales 1707, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales.
    2. Imran H. Shah & Simón Sosvilla‐Rivero, 2021. "Incorporating asset price stability in the European Central Bank's inflation targeting framework," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(2), pages 2022-2043, April.
    3. Imran Hussain Shah & Ahmad Hassan Ahmad, 2017. "How important is the financial sector to price indices in an inflation targeting regime? An empirical analysis of the UK and the US," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1063-1082, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Price Index; Monetary Policy; Output Stability; Financial Markets;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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