IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/lec/leecon/11-03.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Government, Openness and Finance: Past and Present

Author

Listed:
  • Panicos Demetriades

    ()

  • Peter Rousseau

Abstract

We explore the role of government in the nexus of finance and trade starting from the earliest days of organised finance in England and then broadening the analysis to 84 countries from 1960 to 2004. For 18th century England, we find that the government expenditures and international trade did have a positive long-run effect on financial development when measured as the value of private loans made by the Bank of England. For the wider panel of countries and more recent data, we find that government expenditures and trade have positive effects on financial development for countries that are in the mid-ranges of economic development as measured by their per capita incomes, but have little effect for poor countries and strongly negative effects for the wealthiest ones.

Suggested Citation

  • Panicos Demetriades & Peter Rousseau, 2010. "Government, Openness and Finance: Past and Present," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/03, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Oct 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:11/03
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/repec/lec/leecon/dp11-03.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Osterwald-Lenum, Michael, 1992. "A Note with Quantiles of the Asymptotic Distribution of the Maximum Likelihood Cointegration Rank Test Statistics," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 54(3), pages 461-472, August.
    2. Dan Ben-David, 1993. "Equalizing Exchange: Trade Liberalization and Income Convergence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 653-679.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mohammad M Rahaman, 2016. "Chinese import competition and the provisions for external debt financing in the US," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 47(8), pages 898-928, October.
    2. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Bhattacharya, Mita & Kumar, Mantu, 2017. "Financial Development, Industrialisation, Urbanisation and the Role of Institutions: A Comparative Analysis between India and China," MPRA Paper 81609, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Sep 2017.
    3. Bordo, Michael D. & Rousseau, Peter L., 2012. "Historical evidence on the finance-trade-growth nexus," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 1236-1243.
    4. Seven, √únal & Yetkiner, Hakan, 2016. "Financial intermediation and economic growth: Does income matter?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 39-58.
    5. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Narayan, Seema, 2013. "The short-run relationship between the financial system and economic growth: New evidence from regional panels," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 70-78.
    6. Ben Jelili, Riadh & Abdmoulah, Walid, 2013. "Access to Finance Thresholds and the Finance-Growth Nexus," MPRA Paper 52221, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2012.
    7. Walid Abdmoulah & Riadh Ben Jelili, 2013. "Access to Finance Thresholds and the Finance-Growth Nexus," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(4), pages 522-534, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N23 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:11/03. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mrs. Alexandra Mazzuoccolo). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deleiuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.