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The Impact of Financial Liberalisation Policies on Financial Development Evidence from Developing Economies

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  • Philip Arestis
  • Panicos O. Demetriades

    ()

  • Bassam Fattouh
  • Kostas Mouratidis

Abstract

We collect data on a number of financial restraints, including restrictions on deposit and lending interest rates and reserve and liquidity requirements, from central banks of six developing countries. We estimate the effects of these policies on financial development, controlling for the effect of economic development and using standard econometric techniques. We find that the effects of financial policies vary considerably across our sample of countries. Our findings demonstrate that financial liberalisation is a much more complex process than has been assumed by earlier literature and its effects on financial development are ambiguous.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Arestis & Panicos O. Demetriades & Bassam Fattouh & Kostas Mouratidis, 2002. "The Impact of Financial Liberalisation Policies on Financial Development Evidence from Developing Economies," Discussion Papers in Economics 02/1, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:02/1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Demetriades, Panicos O. & P. Devereux, Michael & Luintel, Kul B., 1998. "Productivity and financial sector policies: Evidence from South East Asia," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 61-82, March.
    2. Demetriades, Panicos O. & Luintel, Kul B., 2001. "Financial restraints in the South Korean miracle," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 459-479, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Development; Financial Liberalisation; Cointegration Analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • N2 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions

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