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Internal Migration and Poverty in KwaZulu-Natal: Findings from Censuses, Labour Force Surveys and Panel Data

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Listed:
  • Michael Rogan
  • Likani Lebani
  • Nompumelelo Nzimande

Abstract

In a globalising world, the pace of human mobility has increased alongside flows of capital and goods. Regional integration and trade liberalisation have accompanied these trends and have, arguably, received more attention from both academic researchers and policymakers. Human movement, however, cannot be de-linked from other social and economic events and it is becoming critical to undertake research that identifies the links between human migration and these events.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Rogan & Likani Lebani & Nompumelelo Nzimande, 2009. "Internal Migration and Poverty in KwaZulu-Natal: Findings from Censuses, Labour Force Surveys and Panel Data," SALDRU Working Papers 30, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  • Handle: RePEc:ldr:wpaper:30
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    File URL: http://opensaldru.uct.ac.za/bitstream/handle/11090/25/2009_30.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jonathan Crush & Bruce Frayne, 2007. "The migration and development nexus in Southern Africa Introduction," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 1-23.
    2. Fion De Vletter, 2007. "Migration and development in Mozambique: poverty, inequality and survival," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 137-153.
    3. Murray Leibbrandt & Haroon Bhorat, 1999. "Modelling Vulnerability and Low Earnings in the South African Labour Market," Working Papers 99032, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    4. Lipton, Michael & Ravallion, Martin, 1995. "Poverty and policy," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 41, pages 2551-2657 Elsevier.
    5. Filmer, Deon*Pritchett, Lant, 1998. "Estimating wealth effects without expenditure data - or tears : with an application to educational enrollments in states of India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1994, The World Bank.
    6. France Maphosa, 2007. "Remittances and development: the impact of migration to South Africa on rural livelihoods in southern Zimbabwe," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 123-136.
    7. Natalya Dinat & Sally Peberdy, 2007. "Restless worlds of work, health and migration: domestic workers in Johannesburg," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 186-203.
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    Cited by:

    1. Umakrishnan Kollamparambil, 2017. "Impact of Internal In-Migration on Income Inequality in Receiving Areas: A District Level Study of South Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(12), pages 2145-2163, December.
    2. repec:taf:jdevst:v:52:y:2016:i:9:p:1357-1371 is not listed on IDEAS

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