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Fisheries Subsidies and Management in Open Economies

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  • Naoto Jinji

Abstract

The WTO members are conducting negotiations to clarify and improve disciplines on fisheries subsidies at the Doha Round. In this paper, I investigate how worldwide subsidy reform in the fisheries sector could affect fisheries output and resource stocks in a trading equilibrium. I demonstrate that the effects of a reduction in subsidies on fisheries output will differ, depending on the conditions of the economy and fisheries management in different countries. A possible outcome of a reduction in non-capacity-enhancing subsidies is that fisheries output will rise in countries where catch quotas are not enforced and remain the same in countries where catch quotas are strictly enforced, expanding the total supply of fisheries products in the short run. In the long run, the world fisheries resource stock may be reduced.

Suggested Citation

  • Naoto Jinji, 2011. "Fisheries Subsidies and Management in Open Economies," Discussion papers e-11-004, Graduate School of Economics Project Center, Kyoto University.
  • Handle: RePEc:kue:dpaper:e-11-004
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    File URL: http://www.econ.kyoto-u.ac.jp/projectcenter/Paper/e-11-004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Clark, Colin W. & Munro, Gordon R. & Sumaila, Ussif Rashid, 2005. "Subsidies, buybacks, and sustainable fisheries," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 47-58, July.
    2. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1994. "North-South Trade and the Global Environment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 851-874, September.
    3. de Bovenberg, A Lans & Mooij, Ruud A, 1994. "Environmental Levies and Distortionary Taxation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 1085-1089, September.
    4. U. Sumaila & Ahmed Khan & Andrew Dyck & Reg Watson & Gordon Munro & Peter Tydemers & Daniel Pauly, 2010. "A bottom-up re-estimation of global fisheries subsidies," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 201-225, October.
    5. James A. Brander & M. Scott Taylor, 1997. "International Trade and Open-Access Renewable Resources: The Small Open Economy Case," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(3), pages 526-552, August.
    6. Frank Asche & Trond Bjørndal & Daniel V. Gordon, 2009. "Resource Rent in Individual Quota Fisheries," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(2), pages 279-291.
    7. H. Scott Gordon, 1954. "The Economic Theory of a Common-Property Resource: The Fishery," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62, pages 124-124.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:inecon:v:112:y:2018:i:c:p:13-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Basak Bayramoglu & Brian Copeland & Jean-François Jacques, 2016. "Trade and Fisheries Subsidies," Working Papers 2016.08, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fisheries; subsidies; WTO; SCM Agreement; variable labor supply;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery
    • Q27 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Issues in International Trade

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