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Product and Process Innovations in a Horizontally Differentiated Product Market

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  • Pia Weiß

    ()

Abstract

For horizontal product differentiation, the paper examines the effects of the level of competition on the firm's decision between a product and process innovation. When firms have to choose between the two types of innovation, it is demonstrated that both firms undertake the product innovation when the competition is intense, they choose different investment projects in intermediate competition, and they pursue cost--reducing innovations when competition is less intense. If firms may pursue both innovations, they mix the types depending on the innovation cost structure. Again, firms incur higher costs into product innovations, when the competition is initially intense.

Suggested Citation

  • Pia Weiß, 2001. "Product and Process Innovations in a Horizontally Differentiated Product Market," IWP Discussion Paper Series 07/2001, Institute for Economic Policy, Cologne, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:kln:iwpdip:dp07/01
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rosenkranz, Stephanie, 1995. "Innovation and cooperation under vertical product differentiation," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-22, March.
    2. Greenstein, Shane & Ramey, Garey, 1998. "Market structure, innovation and vertical product differentiation," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 285-311, May.
    3. Bonanno, Giacomo & Haworth, Barry, 1998. "Intensity of competition and the choice between product and process innovation," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 495-510, July.
    4. Martin Peitz, 1999. "A difficulty with the address models of product differentiation," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 14(3), pages 717-727.
    5. Kenneth Arrow, 1962. "Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention," NBER Chapters,in: The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity: Economic and Social Factors, pages 609-626 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Cremer, Helmuth & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 1991. "Location Models of Horizontal Differentiation: A Special Case of Vertical Differentiation Models," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 383-390, June.
    7. Mussa, Michael & Rosen, Sherwin, 1978. "Monopoly and product quality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 301-317, August.
    8. Boone, Jan, 2001. "Intensity of competition and the incentive to innovate," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 705-726, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Product innovation; Process innovation; Horizontal product differentiation;

    JEL classification:

    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets

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