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Religiosity may not be a panacea: Importance of prosociality to maintain humanitarian donations

Author

Listed:
  • Shibly Shahrier

    (Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology)

  • Koji Kotani

    () (Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology)

  • Makoto Kakinaka

    (Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University)

Abstract

Past literature examines determinants of charitable activities and shows that prosocial and religious people provide more contribution. However, when an individual faces opportunities of multiple donations, an interplay among them in the context of substitutability or complementarity, along with limited sources extrinsically and intrinsically, can matter on her choice. In this paper, we study this phenomenon for religious and humanitarian donations by analyzing a survey-experiment data from a developing country, Bangladesh. Our result finds that as the degree of religiosity is intensified, people tend to donate more to religious activities at the expense of humanitarian donation. We argue that such different effects of religiosity originate from limited sources for donations and the substitutability between humanitarian and religious donations. The analysis also presents that social value orientation is an important predictor for humanitarian donation, but not for religious donation, such that prosocials donate more for humanitarian activities than the proselfs. Our results conclude that to maintain humanitarian donations, religiosity may not be a panacea but prosociality is rather needed for a society. Given the argument that ongoing modernization makes people become less prosocial and thus might dissatisfy the growing needs of humanitarian activities that require prosocial behaviors, some policy device is necessary to sustain humanitarian donations in developing countries of Asia and Africa since they are becoming modernization in a faster speed.

Suggested Citation

  • Shibly Shahrier & Koji Kotani & Makoto Kakinaka, 2017. "Religiosity may not be a panacea: Importance of prosociality to maintain humanitarian donations," Working Papers SDES-2017-23, Kochi University of Technology, School of Economics and Management, revised Nov 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:kch:wpaper:sdes-2017-23
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    File URL: http://www.souken.kochi-tech.ac.jp/seido/wp/SDES-2017-23.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Shibly Shahrier & Koji Kotani & Tatsuyoshi Saijo, 2016. "Intergenerational sustainability and the degree of capitalism in the society: A field experiment," Working Papers SDES-2016-10, Kochi University of Technology, School of Economics and Management, revised Jul 2016.
    2. Bauer, Thomas K. & Bredtmann, Julia & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2013. "Time vs. money — The supply of voluntary labor and charitable donations across Europe," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 80-94.
    3. Luke Galen & Michael Sharp & Alison McNulty, 2015. "Nonreligious Group Factors Versus Religious Belief in the Prediction of Prosociality," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(2), pages 411-432, June.
    4. Lambarraa, Fatima & Riener, Gerhard, 2015. "On the norms of charitable giving in Islam: Two field experiments in Morocco," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 69-84.
    5. Shibly Shahrier & Koji Kotani & Makoto Kakinaka, 2016. "Social value orientation and capitalism in societies," Working Papers SDES-2016-1, Kochi University of Technology, School of Economics and Management, revised Feb 2016.
    6. Kevin F. Forbes & Ernest M. Zampelli, 2013. "The impacts of religion, political ideology, and social capital on religious and secular giving: evidence from the 2006 Social Capital Community Survey," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(17), pages 2481-2490, June.
    7. Christopher Einolf, 2013. "Daily Spiritual Experiences and Prosocial Behavior," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 110(1), pages 71-87, January.
    8. Brown, Eleanor & Lankford, Hamilton, 1992. "Gifts of money and gifts of time estimating the effects of tax prices and available time," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 321-341, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Religious and humanitarian donations; religiosity; prosociality; substitutability of multiple donations;

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