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A flexible z-Tree implementation of the Social Value Orientation Slider Measure (Murphy et al. 2011) - Manual -

Author

Listed:
  • Paolo Crosetto

    (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Jena)

  • Ori Weisel

    (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Jena)

  • Fabian Winter

    () (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Jena)

Abstract

This manual describes a z-Tree (Fischbacher, 2007) implementation of the paper-based Social Vaule Orientation (SVO) Slider Measure by Murphy et al. (2011). Using the paper-based version instead of the slider-based version (as implemented on the SVO-Website) avoids server-traffic related delays we experienced in the latter implementation.

Suggested Citation

  • Paolo Crosetto & Ori Weisel & Fabian Winter, 2012. "A flexible z-Tree implementation of the Social Value Orientation Slider Measure (Murphy et al. 2011) - Manual -," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-062, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2012-062
    as

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    File URL: http://pubdb.wiwi.uni-jena.de/pdf/wp_2012_062.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jordi Brandts & Gary Charness, 2000. "Hot vs. Cold: Sequential Responses and Preference Stability in Experimental Games," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 2(3), pages 227-238, March.
    2. Heiko Rauhut & Fabian Winter, 2009. "A sociological perspective on measuring social norms by means of strategy method experiments," Jena Economic Research Papers 2009-054, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    3. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Hugh-Jones & Itay Ron & Ro'i Zultan, 2017. "Humans reciprocate intentional harm by discriminating against group peers," University of East Anglia School of Economics Working Paper Series 2017-03, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    2. Greiff, Matthias & Ackermann, Kurt & Murphy, Ryan O., 2016. "The influences of social context on the measurement of distributional preferences," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145529, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Kurt A. Ackermann & Eva Fleiß & Jürgen Fleiß & Ryan O. Murphy & Alfred Posch, 2014. "Save the planet for humans’ sake: The relation between social and environmental value orientations," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2014-02, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.
    4. repec:eee:gamebe:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:706-725 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Kusterer, David J. & Schmitz, Patrick W., 2017. "The management of innovation: Experimental evidence," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 706-725.
    6. Agnès Festré & Pierre Garrouste & Ankinée Kirakozian & Mira Toumi, 2017. "The Pen Might Be Mightier than the Sword: How Third-party Advice or Sanction Impacts on Pro-environmental Behavior," GREDEG Working Papers 2017-15, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, revised Aug 2017.
    7. Christian Schitter & Jürgen Fleiß & Stefan Palan, 2017. "To claim or not to claim: Anonymity, reciprocal externalities and honesty," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2017-01, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.
    8. Masiliūnas, Aidas, 2017. "Overcoming coordination failure in a critical mass game: Strategic motives and action disclosure," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 214-251.
    9. Christoph Engel & Svenja Hippel, 2017. "Experimental Social Planners: Good Natured, but Overly Optimistic," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2017_23, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    10. Kurt A. Ackermann & Jürgen Fleiß & Ryan O. Murphy, 2013. "Reciprocity as an individual difference," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2013-05, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.
    11. Stefan Palan, 2014. "A Software for Asset Market Experiments," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2014-01, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    z-Tree; Social Value Orientation;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers

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