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Production networks in the Asia-Pacific region : facts and policy implications


  • Hiratsuka, Daisuke


Production networks have been extensively developed in the Asia-Pacific region. This paper employs two micro-level approaches, case studies and econometric analysis, using JETRO's firm surveys which investigate Japanese affiliates operating in Southeast Asia. These two approaches found that production networks have extended, involving suppliers, across various nations in the Asia-Pacific region, and that production bases in host and home countries have different roles. A home country serves as a headquarters with services such as R&D, international marketing, and financing. A high tariff policy in a host country may foster domestic industries through the expansion of procurement from domestic suppliers, either indigenous or foreign, but it may discourage a country from becoming an export platform.

Suggested Citation

  • Hiratsuka, Daisuke, 2011. "Production networks in the Asia-Pacific region : facts and policy implications," IDE Discussion Papers 315, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper315

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. James R. Markusen, 2004. "Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262633078, July.
    2. Karolina Ekholm & Rikard Forslid & James R. Markusen, 2007. "Export-Platform Foreign Direct Investment," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(4), pages 776-795, June.
    3. Deardorff, Alan V., 2001. "Fragmentation in simple trade models," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 121-137, July.
    4. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 2005. "Outsourcing in a Global Economy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(1), pages 135-159.
    5. Mitsuyo Ando & Fukunari Kimura, 2005. "The Formation of International Production and Distribution Networks in East Asia," NBER Chapters,in: International Trade in East Asia, NBER-East Asia Seminar on Economics, Volume 14, pages 177-216 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Hayakawa, Kazunobu & Matsuura, Toshiyuki, 2011. "Complex vertical FDI and firm heterogeneity: Evidence from East Asia," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 273-289, September.
    7. Hiratsuka, Daisuke, 2011. "Production Networks in Asia: A Case Study from the Hard Disk Drive Industry," ADBI Working Papers 301, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    8. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    9. Daisuke Hiratsuka & Yoko Uchida (ed.), 2010. "Input Trade and Production Networks in East Asia," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13909.
    10. Gordon H. Hanson & Raymond J. Mataloni & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2005. "Vertical Production Networks in Multinational Firms," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(4), pages 664-678, November.
    11. Hillberry, Russell & Hummels, David, 2008. "Trade responses to geographic frictions: A decomposition using micro-data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 527-550, April.
    12. James R. Markusen, 1997. "Trade versus Investment Liberalization," NBER Working Papers 6231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Hummels, David & Ishii, Jun & Yi, Kei-Mu, 2001. "The nature and growth of vertical specialization in world trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 75-96, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Felipe López Aymes, 2014. "Encadenamientos productivos en el sureste de Asia: integración a las redes globales con empresas locales," REVISTA DIGITAL MUNDO ASIA PACIFICO, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT, vol. 4(5), pages 24-51, December.
    2. Masahiro Kawai & Ganeshan Wignaraja, 2014. "Policy challenges posed by Asian free trade agreements: a review of the evidence," Chapters,in: A World Trade Organization for the 21st Century, chapter 8, pages 182-238 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Claes G. Alvstam & Erja Kettunen & Patrik Ström, 2017. "The service sector in the free-trade agreement between the EU and Singapore: closing the gap between policy and business realities," Asia Europe Journal, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 75-105, March.
    4. repec:ibn:ibrjnl:v:11:y:2018:i:1:p:230-244 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Southeast Asia; Japan; Foreign affiliated firm; Industrial management; Production management; International economic relations; Skilled differentiation; High tariff policy; Export-platform FDI;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production

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