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How Important Is Guaranteed or Institutionalised Overtime?

Author

Listed:
  • Bell, David N.F.

    () (University of Stirling)

  • Hart, Robert A.

    () (University of Stirling)

Abstract

Basing our empirical work on the British New Earnings Survey Panel Data between 1990 and 1996, we show that overtime hours of male workers contain significant individual effects. We also show that using suitable techniques to deal with the lagged overtime variable serves to alter radically the estimated speed of adjustment of overtime to its desired level. Our results are consistent with firms either guaranteeing the length of weekly overtime or following institutionalised custom and practice in their overtime arrangements. They are far less supportive of traditional demand-side analyses of overtime working.

Suggested Citation

  • Bell, David N.F. & Hart, Robert A., 2003. "How Important Is Guaranteed or Institutionalised Overtime?," IZA Discussion Papers 766, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp766
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hansen, Lars Peter, 1982. "Large Sample Properties of Generalized Method of Moments Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 1029-1054, July.
    2. Rosen, Sherwin & Nadiri, M Ishaq, 1974. "A Disequilibrium Model of Demand for Factors of Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(2), pages 264-270, May.
    3. Topel, Robert H, 1982. "Inventories, Layoffs, and the Short-Run Demand for Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 769-787, September.
    4. Hart, Robert A & Ruffell, Robin J, 1993. "The Cost of Overtime Hours in British Production Industries," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 60(238), pages 183-201, May.
    5. Bils, Mark, 1987. "The Cyclical Behavior of Marginal Cost and Price," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(5), pages 838-855, December.
    6. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    7. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anger, Silke, 2008. "Overtime Work as a Signaling Device," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 167-189.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    overtime hours; individual effects; GMM estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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