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How Do Tougher Immigration Measures Impact Unauthorized Immigrants?

  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina

    ()

    (San Diego State University)

  • Puttitanun, Thitima

    ()

    (San Diego State University)

  • Martinez-Donate, Ana

    ()

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

The recent impetus of tougher immigration-related measures passed at the state-level raises concerns about the impact of such measures on the migration experience, trajectory and future plans of unauthorized immigrants. In a recent and unique survey of Mexican unauthorized immigrants interviewed upon their voluntary return or deportation to Mexico, almost a third reports experiencing difficulties in obtaining social or government services, finding legal assistance or obtaining health care services. Additionally, half of them report fearing deportation despite all of them being unauthorized. When we assess how the enactment of punitive measures against unauthorized immigrants, such as E-Verify mandates, has impacted their migration experience, we find no evidence of a statistically significant association between these measures and the difficulties reported by unauthorized immigrants in accessing a variety of services. However, the enactment of these mandates infuses deportation fear and reduces inter-state mobility among voluntary returnees during their last migration spell, and helps curb deportees' intent to return to the United States in the near future.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7134.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Demography, 2013, 50(3), 1067-91
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7134
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  1. Susan M. Richter & J. Edward Taylor & Antonio Yúnez-Naude, 2007. "Impacts of Policy Reforms on Labor Migration from Rural Mexico to the United States," NBER Chapters, in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 269-288 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Gordon H. Hanson & Antonio Spilimbergo, 1996. "Illegal Immigration, Border Enforcement, and Relative Wages: Evidence from Apprehensions at the U.S.-Mexico Border," NBER Working Papers 5592, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Davila, Alberto & Pagan, Jose A. & Soydemir, Gokce, 2002. "The short-term and long-term deterrence effects of INS border and interior enforcement on undocumented immigration," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 459-472, December.
  4. Pia Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2003. "Do amnesty programs reduce undocumented immigration? Evidence from Irca," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(3), pages 437-450, August.
  5. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Fernando Antonio Lozano, 2014. "On the Effectiveness of SB1070 in Arizona," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1423, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  6. Pia M. Orrenius, 2001. "Illegal immigration and enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border; an overview," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q I, pages 2-11.
  7. Sherrie Kossoudji, 1992. "Playing Cat and Mouse at the U.S.-Mexican Border," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 29(2), pages 159-180, May.
  8. Katharine Donato & Jorge Durand & Douglas Massey, 1992. "Stemming the tide? Assessing the deterrent effects of the immigration reform and control act," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 29(2), pages 139-157, May.
  9. Patrick A. Rivers & Fausto G. Patino, 2006. "Barriers to health care access for Latino immigrants in the USA," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(3), pages 207-220, March.
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