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Job Mobility along the Technological Ladder: A Case Study of Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Meng, Xin

    () (Australian National University)

  • Junankar, Pramod N. (Raja)

    () (University of New South Wales)

  • Kapuscinski, Cezary A.

    (affiliation not available)

Abstract

Labour economists have been increasingly interested in the impact of technological change upon employment and unemployment. However, the predominant focus of empirical studies has been on employment and unemployment stocks, whereas technological change is more likely to affect the flows of labour. This paper focuses on the latter issue. In particular, given the technological change, two major questions posed in this paper are: (i) who moves from low-tech to high-tech jobs and who moves from high-tech to low-tech jobs, and (ii) what are the factors which drive such movements. The data used in this study are from the 1994 Australian Labour Mobility Survey. A new index describing the technological level of a job is constructed and the magnitude and direction of movements along the technological ladder are examined. Using individual-level socio-economic variables, we explain the determinants of the direction of the job change. Some relevant policy implications are also discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Meng, Xin & Junankar, Pramod N. (Raja) & Kapuscinski, Cezary A., 2004. "Job Mobility along the Technological Ladder: A Case Study of Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 1169, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1169
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sicherman, Nachum & Galor, Oded, 1990. "A Theory of Career Mobility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(1), pages 169-192, February.
    2. Dunne, Timothy & Schmitz, James A, Jr, 1995. "Wages, Employment Structure and Employer Size-Wage Premia: Their Relationship to Advanced-Technology Usage at US Manufacturing Establishments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 62(245), pages 89-107, February.
    3. Ann P. Bartel & Nachum Sicherman, 1999. "Technological Change and Wages: An Interindustry Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 285-325, April.
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    9. Davis, Steven J. & Haltiwanger, John, 1999. "Gross job flows," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 41, pages 2711-2805 Elsevier.
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    12. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1998. "The Origins of Technology-Skill Complementarity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 693-732.
    13. Jacob Mincer, 1958. "Investment in Human Capital and Personal Income Distribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 281-281.
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    15. Horst Entorf & Francis Kramarz, 1998. "The Impact Of New Technologies On Wages: Lessons From Matching Panels On Employees And On Their Firms," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2-4), pages 165-198.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    job mobility; technological ladder; employment and unemployment flows;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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