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Education, Governance and Trade-Related Technology Diffusion in Latin America


  • Schiff, Maurice

    () (World Bank)

  • Wang, Yanling

    () (Carleton University)


This paper examines the impact on TFP of North-South trade-related technology diffusion in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). North-South R&D flows are constructed based on industry-specific R&D in the North, North-South trade patterns, and input-output relations in the South. The main findings are: (i) Education and governance raise the level of TFP directly; and (ii) education and governance also raise TFP through their interaction with foreign R&D in R&D-intensive industries. These results imply a) that potential virtuous growth cycles exist both in the level and in the growth of TFP, and b) that taking into account the interaction effects between trade, education and governance by reforming the policies simultaneously will have a greater impact on TFP.

Suggested Citation

  • Schiff, Maurice & Wang, Yanling, 2004. "Education, Governance and Trade-Related Technology Diffusion in Latin America," IZA Discussion Papers 1028, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1028

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Coe, David T. & Helpman, Elhanan, 1995. "International R&D spillovers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 859-887, May.
    2. Coe, David T & Helpman, Elhanan & Hoffmaister, Alexander W, 1997. "North-South R&D Spillovers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 134-149, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gouranga Gopal Das & Soamiely Andriamananjara, 2006. "Hub-and-Spokes Free Trade Agreements in the Presence of Technology Spillovers: An Application to the Western Hemisphere," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(1), pages 33-66, April.
    2. Boopen SEETANAH & viraiyan teeroovengadum, 2017. "Higher Education and Economic Growth: Evidence from Africa," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 4807254, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    3. Indunil De Silva & Sudarno Sumarto, 2015. "Dynamics Of Growth, Poverty And Human Capital: Evidence From Indonesian Sub-National Data," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 40(2), pages 1-33, June.
    4. Jalil, Abdul & Idrees, Muhammad, 2013. "Modeling the impact of education on the economic growth: Evidence from aggregated and disaggregated time series data of Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 383-388.

    More about this item


    technology diffusion; trade; R&D intensity; education; governance; Latin America;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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