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Tariffs, Technology and Global Integration

  • Sebastián Claro

    ()

    (Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.)

In the last two decades tariffs around the globe have fallen significantly. However, less well known are their changes in the sectorial structure of protection rates. Between 1988 and 1998, relative tariffs have increased in capital-intensive sectors, and this shift is specially strong in low wage countries. These changes in tariff structures reflect the response of governments to increasing integration in product and capital markets in the presence of international technology differences. Integration in factor markets revives the concept of absolute advantage, and countries adjust their tariff structure in order to compensate for technology differences and cost pressures in order to keep a diversified production structure. As a corollary, wage differences increase both within and between countries.

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File URL: http://www.economia.puc.cl/docs/dt_240.pdf
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Paper provided by Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. in its series Documentos de Trabajo with number 240.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:ioe:doctra:240
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  1. Susan Chun Zhu & Daniel Trefler, 2001. "Ginis in General Equilibrium: Trade, Technology and Southern Inequality," NBER Working Papers 8446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Feenstra, Robert C. & Hanson, Gordon H., 1997. "Foreign direct investment and relative wages: Evidence from Mexico's maquiladoras," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-4), pages 371-393, May.
  3. Haskel, Jonathan E. & Slaughter, Matthew J., 2002. "Does the sector bias of skill-biased technical change explain changing skill premia?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1757-1783, December.
  4. Sebastián Claro, 2002. "A Cross-Country Estimation of the Elasticity of Substitution between Labor and Capital in Manufacturing Industries," Documentos de Trabajo 226, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
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