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On the measurement of polarization for ordinal data

  • Martyna Kobus

    ()

    (Warsaw University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Dluga 44/50, 00-241 Warsaw, Poland.)

Atkinson’s Theorem (Atkinson, 1970) is a classic result in inequality measurement. It establishes Lorenz dominance as a useful criterion for comparative judgements of inequality between distributions. If a Lorenz distribution A dominates distribution B, then all indices in a broad class of measures must confirm A as less unequal than B. Recent research, however, shows that standard inequality theory cannot be applied to ordinal data (Zheng, 2008), such as self-reported health status or educational attainment. A new theory in development (Apouey, 2007; Abul Naga and Yalcin, 2008) measures disparity of ordinal data as polarization. Typically a criterion used to compare distributions is the polarization relation as proposed by Allison and Foster (AF) (2004). We characterize classes of polarization measures equivalent to the AF relation analogously to Atkinson’s original approach.

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File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2014-325.pdf
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Paper provided by ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality in its series Working Papers with number 325.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2014-325
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.ecineq.org
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  1. Oswald, A.J., 1997. "Happiness and Economic Performance," Papers 18, Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics.
  2. Benedicte Apouey, 2007. "Measuring health polarization with self-assessed health data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(9), pages 875-894.
  3. Wolfson, Michael C, 1997. "Divergent Inequalities: Theory and Empirical Results," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 43(4), pages 401-21, December.
  4. Ramses H. Abul Naga & Tarik Yalcin, 2007. "Inequality Measurement forOrdered Response Health Data," STICERD - Distributional Analysis Research Programme Papers 92, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  5. Buhong Zheng, 2011. "A new approach to measure socioeconomic inequality in health," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 555-577, December.
  6. Hemming, R. & Keen, M. J., 1983. "Single-crossing conditions in comparisons of tax progressivity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 373-380, April.
  7. Rafael Di Tella & Robert MacCulloch, 2006. "Some Uses of Happiness Data in Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 25-46, Winter.
  8. Wolfson, Michael C, 1994. "When Inequalities Diverge," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 353-58, May.
  9. Dasgupta, Partha & Sen, Amartya & Starrett, David, 1973. "Notes on the measurement of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 180-187, April.
  10. Daniel Kahneman & Alan B. Krueger, 2006. "Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
  11. Shorrocks, Anthony F, 1984. "Inequality Decomposition by Population Subgroups," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(6), pages 1369-85, November.
  12. Allison, R. Andrew & Foster, James E., 2004. "Measuring health inequality using qualitative data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 505-524, May.
  13. Kobus, Martyna & Miłoś, Piotr, 2012. "Inequality decomposition by population subgroups for ordinal data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 15-21.
  14. Esteban, J.M. & Ray, D., 1992. "On the Measurement of Polarization," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 171.92, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  15. Wang, You-Qiang & Tsui, Kai-Yuen, 2000. " Polarization Orderings and New Classes of Polarization Indices," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 2(3), pages 349-63.
  16. Atkinson, Anthony B., 1970. "On the measurement of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 244-263, September.
  17. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-81, September.
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