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Connections Matter: How Personal Network Structure Influences Biomedical Scientists’ Engagement in Medical Innovation

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  • Llopis,Oscar

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  • D’Este,Pablo

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Abstract

In this study, we analyze the determinants of biomedical scientists’ participation in various types of activities and outputs related to medical innovation. More specifically, we argue that scientists occupying brokerage positions among their contacts will in a more favorable position to deliver medical innovation outcomes, compared to scientists embedded in more dense networks. However, we also theorize that beyond a threshold, the coordination costs of brokerage may surpass its potential benefits. In addition to that, we study the influence of two individual-level attributes as potential determinants of the participation in medical innovation activities: cognitive breadth and perceived beneficiary impact. We situate our analysis within the context of the Spanish biomedical research framework, where we analyze a sample of 1,309 biomedical scientists.

Suggested Citation

  • Llopis,Oscar & D’Este,Pablo, 2014. "Connections Matter: How Personal Network Structure Influences Biomedical Scientists’ Engagement in Medical Innovation," INGENIO (CSIC-UPV) Working Paper Series 201402, INGENIO (CSIC-UPV), revised 07 Mar 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:ing:wpaper:201402
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    File URL: http://www.ingenio.upv.es/sites/default/files/working-paper/2014-02.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Perkmann, Markus & Tartari, Valentina & McKelvey, Maureen & Autio, Erkko & Broström, Anders & D’Este, Pablo & Fini, Riccardo & Geuna, Aldo & Grimaldi, Rosa & Hughes, Alan & Krabel, Stefan & Kitson, Mi, 2013. "Academic engagement and commercialisation: A review of the literature on university–industry relations," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 423-442.
    2. Morgan, Myfanwy & Barry, Christine A. & Donovan, Jenny L. & Sandall, Jane & Wolfe, Charles D.A. & Boaz, Annette, 2011. "Implementing ‘translational’ biomedical research: Convergence and divergence among clinical and basic scientists," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(7), pages 945-952.
    3. Rotolo, Daniele & Messeni Petruzzelli, Antonio, 2013. "When does centrality matter? Scientific productivity and the moderating role of research specialization and cross-community ties," MPRA Paper 53406, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Ding, Waverly & Choi, Emily, 2011. "Divergent paths to commercial science: A comparison of scientists' founding and advising activities," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 69-80, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Llopis, Oscar & D’Este, Pablo, 2016. "Beneficiary contact and innovation: The relation between contact with patients and medical innovation under different institutional logics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 1512-1523.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Capital; Ego-Network Brokerage; Medical innovation; Translational Research; Perceived Beneficiary Impact; Cognitive Breadth;

    JEL classification:

    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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