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Determinants of Long-term Economic Development: An Empirical Cross-country Study Involving Rough Sets Theory and Rule Induction


  • Obersteiner, Michael

    (Institute for Advanced Studies)

  • Wilk, Szymon

    (International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis)


Empirical findings on determinants of long-term economic growth are numerous, sometimes inconsistent, highly exciting and still incomplete. The empirical analysis was almost exclusively carried out by standard econometrics. This study compares results gained by cross-country regressions as reported in the literature with those gained by the rough sets theory and rule induction. The main advantages of using rough sets are being able to classify classes and to discretize. Thus, we do not have to deal with distributional, independence, (log-)linearity, and many other assumptions, but can keep the data as they are. The main difference between regression results and rough sets is that most education and human capital indicators can be labeled as robust attributes. In addition, we find that political indicators enter in a non-linear fashion with respect to growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Obersteiner, Michael & Wilk, Szymon, 1999. "Determinants of Long-term Economic Development: An Empirical Cross-country Study Involving Rough Sets Theory and Rule Induction," Transition Economics Series 11, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihstep:11

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1998. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522543, January.
    3. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
    4. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1997. "I Just Ran Two Million Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 178-183, May.
    5. J. Stiglitz, 1998. "More Instruments and Broader Goals: Moving toward the PostWashington Consensus," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 8.
    6. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1992. "A Sensitivity Analysis of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 942-963, September.
    7. Durlauf, Steven N. & Quah, Danny T., 1999. "The new empirics of economic growth," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 235-308 Elsevier.
    8. Paul Krugman, 1998. "Space: The Final Frontier," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 161-174, Spring.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    More about this item


    Economic growth; Rough sets; Rule induction;

    JEL classification:

    • C49 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Other
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General


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