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Métodos de búsqueda y resultados en países en desarrollo: el caso de Venezuela


  • Gustavo Márquez


  • Cristobal Ruiz-Tagle


(Disponible en idioma inglés únicamente) En este trabajo se emplean datos de panel de Venezuela recabados recientemente correspondientes al período de 1994 a 2002 para analizar tres cuestiones básicas: la primera tiene que ver con la influencia de las características individuales y la experiencia previa en el mercado laboral en la elección de métodos de búsqueda distintos. La segunda se refiere a la eficacia de diversos métodos de búsqueda para salir del desempleo y se controlan las características individuales y de los empleos anteriores. Por último, la tercera cuestión se relaciona con la situación laboral previa, mediante el análisis de la importancia relativa del método de búsqueda y la situación laboral anterior, para determinar la probabilidad de conseguir empleo o quedar fuera de la fuerza laboral. Concluimos que la situación laboral anterior es un factor principal que determina si se pasa a una situación de empleo y que el uso de agencias de empleo hace aumentar la probabilidad de ese paso en cada situación laboral.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustavo Márquez & Cristobal Ruiz-Tagle, 2004. "Métodos de búsqueda y resultados en países en desarrollo: el caso de Venezuela," Research Department Publications 4384, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4384

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Holzer, Harry J, 1988. "Search Method Use by Unemployed Youth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(1), pages 1-20, January.
    2. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal, 2002. "Job search methods and outcomes," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 505-533, July.
    3. Gregg, Paul & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 1996. "How Effective Are State Employment Agencies? Jobcentre Use and Job Matching in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(3), pages 443-467, August.
    4. Lawrence M. Kahn & Stuart A. Low, 1988. "Systematic and Random Search A Synthesis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(1), pages 1-20.
    5. Chirinko, Robert S, 1982. "An Empirical Investigation of the Returns to Job Search," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 498-501, June.
    6. Mortensen, Dale T, 1970. "Job Search, the Duration of Unemployment, and the Phillips Curve," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(5), pages 847-862, December.
    7. John M. Barron & Wesley Mellow, 1979. "Search Effort in the Labor Market," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(3), pages 389-404.
    8. Narendranathan, Wiji & Nickell, Stephen, 1985. "Modelling the process of job search," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 29-49, April.
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