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Search Methods and Outcomes in Developing Countries: The Case of Venezuela

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  • Gustavo Márquez

    ()

  • Cristobal Ruiz-Tagle

Abstract

This paper uses a newly developed panel data set for Venezuela in the period between 1994 and 2002 to analyze three basic questions. the first relates to the influence of personal characteristics and previous labor market experience in the choice of different search methods. The second question addresses the effectiveness of different search methods in moving out of unemployment, controlling for personal characteristics and previous job characteristics. Finally, the third questionpoints to the issue of former labor status by analyzing the relative weight of search method and previous job status in the determination of the likelihood of landing a job or dropping out of the labor force. We conclude that previous job status is a primary determinant of success in moving to employment, and that the use of employment agencies increases the likelihood of that move within each labor status.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustavo Márquez & Cristobal Ruiz-Tagle, 2004. "Search Methods and Outcomes in Developing Countries: The Case of Venezuela," Research Department Publications 4383, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4383
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Holzer, Harry J, 1988. "Search Method Use by Unemployed Youth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(1), pages 1-20, January.
    2. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal, 2002. "Job search methods and outcomes," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 505-533, July.
    3. Gregg, Paul & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 1996. "How Effective Are State Employment Agencies? Jobcentre Use and Job Matching in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(3), pages 443-467, August.
    4. Lawrence M. Kahn & Stuart A. Low, 1988. "Systematic and Random Search A Synthesis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(1), pages 1-20.
    5. Chirinko, Robert S, 1982. "An Empirical Investigation of the Returns to Job Search," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 498-501, June.
    6. Mortensen, Dale T, 1970. "Job Search, the Duration of Unemployment, and the Phillips Curve," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(5), pages 847-862, December.
    7. John M. Barron & Wesley Mellow, 1979. "Search Effort in the Labor Market," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(3), pages 389-404.
    8. Narendranathan, Wiji & Nickell, Stephen, 1985. "Modelling the process of job search," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 29-49, April.
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