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The Bright Side of Private Benefits

Author

Listed:
  • Hori, Kazumi

Abstract

In many cases, the cost of an agent acquiring information is lower than that for the principal. However, because of a private benefit difference between the principal's and agent's preferences, the principal often cannot fully utilize the agent's advantage. This paper considers the cost of motivating the agent to acquire information and inducing him/her to report it truthfully. As usual, the larger the private benefit, the larger the cost of eliciting true information. At the same time, the private benefit may reduce the cost of motivating information acquisition. Thus, there are cases in which an agent with a different preference is desirable.

Suggested Citation

  • Hori, Kazumi, 2006. "The Bright Side of Private Benefits," Discussion Papers 2006-01, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:econdp:2006-01
    Note: May 1, 2006
    as

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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/16995/1/070econDP06-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Takao Kato & Motohiro Morishima, 1995. "The Productivity Effects of Human Resource Management Practices: Evidence from New Japanese Panel Data," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_143, Levy Economics Institute.
    2. Cremer, Jacques & Khalil, Fahad & Rochet, Jean-Charles, 1998. "Strategic Information Gathering before a Contract Is Offered," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-200, July.
    3. Cremer, Jacques & Khalil, Fahad & Rochet, Jean-Charles, 1998. "Contracts and Productive Information Gathering," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 174-193, November.
    4. Helmut Bester & Roland Strausz, "undated". "Imperfect Commitment and the Revelation Principle," Papers 004, Departmental Working Papers.
    5. Stole, Lars A, 1992. "The Economics of Liquidated Damage Clauses in Contractual Environments with Private Information," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(3), pages 582-606, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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