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Political Mobilization in Tibet

Author

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  • Christopher Paik

    () (New York University, Abu Dhabi)

Abstract

This paper aims to investigate the root of ongoing conflict between China and Tibetan regions for independence. By using the data collected from waves of protests in 2008 across Tibetan regions in China, it investigates the extent to which the physical Han Chinese presence led to political mobilization. The findings show that regions with stronger presence of Han population witnessed less protests, suggesting powerful influence of geography and ethnic integration on the spread of Tibetan Buddhism and independence movement over a long period of time. In order to explain the settlement patterns of Han Chinese in Tibet, the paper exploits the physiological differences between Tibetans and Han Chinese in their abilities to adapt to high altitudes.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Paik, 2013. "Political Mobilization in Tibet," HiCN Working Papers 155, Households in Conflict Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:155
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Enrico Spolaore & Romain Wacziarg, 2009. "The Diffusion of Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 469-529.
    2. Stelios Michalopoulos, 2012. "The Origins of Ethnolinguistic Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(4), pages 1508-1539, June.
    3. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    4. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Keywords

    religion; geography; ethnic conflict; migration; China; Tibet;

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