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Regional Clustering of Human Capital - School Grades and Migration of University Graduates


  • Tano, Sofia

    () (Department of Economics, Umeå School of Business and Economics)


The spatial distribution of human capital plays a fundamental role for regional differences in economic growth and welfare. This paper examines how individual ability indicated by the grade point average (GPA), from comprehensive school, affects the probability of migration among young university graduates in Sweden. Using detailed micro data available from the Swedish population registers, the study examines two cohorts of individuals who enrol in tertiary education. The results indicate that individual abilities reflected by the GPA are strongly influential when it comes to completing a university degree and for the migration decision after graduation. Moreover, there is a positive relationship between the GPA and the choice of migrating from regions with a relatively low tax base and a relatively small share of highly educated people in the population. Analogously, individuals with a high GPA tend to stay at a higher rate in more flourishing regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Tano, Sofia, 2014. "Regional Clustering of Human Capital - School Grades and Migration of University Graduates," Umeå Economic Studies 879, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:umnees:0879

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    Cited by:

    1. John V. Winters, 2017. "Do earnings by college major affect graduate migration?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 59(3), pages 629-649, November.
    2. Guerreiro, Gertrudes & Caleiro, António, 2014. "A convergência espacial do conhecimento em Portugal
      [The spatial convergence of knowledge in Portugal]
      ," MPRA Paper 56176, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Gertrudes Saúde Guerreiro & António Bento Caleiro, 2015. "The Spatial Convergence of Knowledge in Portugal," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2015_08, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).
    4. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0753-x is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Bivariate probit; individual ability; migration; regional clustering; university graduates;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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