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Variations in Fertility - a Consequense of Other Factors Besides Love?

Author

Listed:
  • Löfström, Åsa

    () (Department of Economics, Umeå University)

  • Westerberg, Thomas

    () (Department of Economics, Umeå University)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to discuss possible explanations for the variation in the Swedish fertility rate. We are primarily interested in economic and social conditions and their impact on the total fertility rate between 1965 and 2003. The results from the study support a positive e¤ect on fertility from the female labour market participation and child allowance while divorces report a negative e¤ect on fertility. The model including level as well as di¤erences in the variables has been found to give the best results.

Suggested Citation

  • Löfström, Åsa & Westerberg, Thomas, 2006. "Variations in Fertility - a Consequense of Other Factors Besides Love?," Umeå Economic Studies 681, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:umnees:0681
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maria Melkersson & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2000. "Modeling female fertility using inflated count data models," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(2), pages 189-203.
    2. Cigno, Alessandro & Ermisch, John, 1989. "A microeconomic analysis of the timing of births," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 737-760, April.
    3. Butz, William P & Ward, Michael P, 1979. "The Emergence of Countercyclical U.S. Fertility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(3), pages 318-328, June.
    4. Pedro Mira & Namkee Ahn, 2002. "A note on the changing relationship between fertility and female employment rates in developed countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(4), pages 667-682.
    5. Tomas Kögel, 2004. "Did the association between fertility and female employment within OECD countries really change its sign?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 45-65, February.
    6. Winegarden, Calman R, 1984. "Women's Fertility, Market Work and Marital Status: A Test of the New Household Economics with International Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 51(204), pages 447-456, November.
    7. Jacques Poot & Jacques J. Siegers, 2001. "The macroeconomics of fertility in small open economies: A test of the Becker-Barro model for The Netherlands and New Zealand," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(1), pages 73-100.
    8. Naz, G., 2000. "Determinants of Fertility in Norway," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 1400, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
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    Cited by:

    1. Westerberg, Thomas, 2006. "MoreWork, Less Kids - The Relationship Between Market Experience and Number of Children," Umeå Economic Studies 682, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    2. Westerberg, Thomas, 2006. "Two Papers On Fertility - The Case Of Sweden," Umeå Economic Studies 683, Umeå University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Total fertility rate; Economics; Sweden; Time-series;

    JEL classification:

    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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