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Species Imperilment on the Global Scale: Empirical evidences of economic causes

Author

Listed:
  • Gren, Ing-Marie

    () (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)

  • Campos, Monica

    (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)

  • Gustafsson, Lena

    (Department of Ecology)

  • Elofsson, Katarina

    (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)

Abstract

Economic factors contribute to biodiversity directly through activities such as pollution and land use, and indirectly by affecting preferences and institutional capabilities of implementing mitigation measures. This paper tests the explanatory power of these different mechanisms on threats to biodiversity on a global scale. Econometric analyses are performed with invasive species, land use, climate, economic prosperity, corruption, and spatial autocorrelation as explanatory variables. This is carried out for all taxonomic groups and separately for mammals, birds, plants, amphibians, and reptiles. Different models are tested and robust results appear for detrimental effects of invasive species, pollution, and high average temperature. Results also indicate that economic prosperity and institutional capacity do not act as curbing factors in isolation, but instead together which points out the need for sufficient levels of both prosperity and institutional capability in order to preserve biodiversity. These impacts are significant for all taxonomic groups but of different magnitude. Plants show the highest relative response to several factors and mammals the lowest.

Suggested Citation

  • Gren, Ing-Marie & Campos, Monica & Gustafsson, Lena & Elofsson, Katarina, 2013. "Species Imperilment on the Global Scale: Empirical evidences of economic causes," Working Paper Series 2013:7, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:slueko:2013_007
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    File URL: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/10550/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aidt, Toke & Dutta, Jayasri & Sena, Vania, 2008. "Governance regimes, corruption and growth: Theory and evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 195-220, June.
    2. Gren, Ing-Marie & Thierfelder, Tomas & Berglund, Helena, 2011. "Country characteristics and non-indigenous species," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(01), pages 51-70, February.
    3. Pandit, Ram & Laband, David N., 2007. "Spatial autocorrelation in country-level models of species imperilment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 526-532, January.
    4. McPherson, Michael A. & Nieswiadomy, Michael L., 2005. "Environmental Kuznets curve: threatened species and spatial effects," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 395-407, November.
    5. Halkos, George & Tzeremes, Nickolaos, 2009. "Exploring the effect of countries’ economic prosperity on their biodiversity performance," MPRA Paper 32102, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Justin Tevie & Kristine M. Grimsrud & Robert P. Berrens, 2011. "Testing the Environmental Kuznets Curve Hypothesis for Biodiversity Risk in the US: A Spatial Econometric Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(11), pages 1-18, November.
    7. Mills, Julianne H. & Waite, Thomas A., 2009. "Economic prosperity, biodiversity conservation, and the environmental Kuznets curve," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 2087-2095, May.
    8. Pandit, Ram & Laband, David N., 2007. "General and specific spatial autocorrelation: Insights from country-level analysis of species imperilment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 75-80, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    threatened species; climate; land use; non-indigenous species; spatial autocorrelation; economic development; institutions; econometrics;

    JEL classification:

    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics

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