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A Challenger to the Limit Order Book: The NYSE Specialist

Author

Listed:
  • Buti, Sabrina

    () (University of Toronto - Joseph L. Rotman School of Management)

Abstract

This paper gives a new answer to the challenging question raised by Glosten (1994): "Is the electronic order book inevitable?". While the order book enables traders to compete to supply anonymous liquidity, the specialist system enables one to reap the benefits from repeated interaction. We compare a competitive limit order book and a limit order book with a specialist, like the NYSE. Thanks to non-anonymous interaction, mediated by brokers, uninformed investors can obtain good liquidity from the specialist. This, however, creates an adverse selection problem on the limit order book. Market liquidity and social welfare are improved by the specialist if adverse selection is severe and if brokers have long horizon, so that reputation becomes a matter of concern for them. In contrast, if asymmetric information is limited, spreads are wider and utilitarian welfare is lower when the specialist competes with the limit order book than in a pure limit order book market.

Suggested Citation

  • Buti, Sabrina, 2007. "A Challenger to the Limit Order Book: The NYSE Specialist," SIFR Research Report Series 55, Institute for Financial Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sifrwp:0055
    as

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    File URL: http://www.sifr.org/PDFs/sifr-wp55.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kenneth A. Kavajecz, 1999. "A Specialist's Quoted Depth and the Limit Order Book," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(2), pages 747-771, April.
    2. Bruno Biais & David Martimort & Jean-Charles Rochet, 2000. "Competing Mechanisms in a Common Value Environment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(4), pages 799-838, July.
    3. Seppi, Duane J, 1997. "Liquidity Provision with Limit Orders and a Strategic Specialist," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 10(1), pages 103-150.
    4. Cecilia Caglio & Kenneth A. Kavajecz, 2006. "A Specialist'S Quoted Depth As A Strategic Choice Variable: An Application To Spread Decomposition Models," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 29(3), pages 367-382.
    5. Desgranges, Gabriel & Foucault, Thierry, 2005. "Reputation-based pricing and price improvements," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 57(6), pages 493-527.
    6. Ready, Mark J, 1999. "The Specialist's Discretion: Stopped Orders and Price Improvement," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 12(5), pages 1075-1112.
    7. Fishe, Raymond P. H. & Robe, Michel A., 2004. "The impact of illegal insider trading in dealer and specialist markets: evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 461-488, March.
    8. Bernhardt, Dan & Hughson, Eric, 1997. "Splitting Orders," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 10(1), pages 69-101.
    9. Shane A. Corwin, 1999. "Differences in Trading Behavior across NYSE Specialist Firms," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(2), pages 721-745, April.
    10. Glosten, Lawrence R, 1994. " Is the Electronic Open Limit Order Book Inevitable?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1127-1161, September.
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    12. Garfinkel, Jon A. & Nimalendran, M., 2003. "Market Structure and Trader Anonymity: An Analysis of Insider Trading," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(03), pages 591-610, September.
    13. Bessembinder, Hendrik & Kaufman, Herbert M., 1997. "A cross-exchange comparison of execution costs and information flow for NYSE-listed stocks," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 293-319, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Limit order book; specialist; hybrid market;

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage

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