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Cross-talk in economics and neuroscience

Author

Listed:
  • Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde

    () (IJN - Institut Jean-Nicod - DEC - Département d'Etudes Cognitives - ENS Paris - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Département de Philosophie - ENS Paris - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris)

  • Carl Schoonover

    (Columbia University [New York])

Abstract

Neuroeconomics is a recent extension of behavioral economics which aims at uncovering the brain mechanisms and activities that mediate regular and anomalous behaviour. Gul and Pesendorfer (2005) have launched a critique against the neuroeconomic research program, based on what they argue is the incommensurability of the theoretical constructs employed by each respective discipline. To respond to their argument we envision and illustrate several "directions of instruction" between neuroscience and economics, and provide counter-examples to their critique. This disciplinary cross-talk suggests that neuroeconomics may play a crucial conceptual and methodological role in fostering the unity of behavioral sciences.

Suggested Citation

  • Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde & Carl Schoonover, 2008. "Cross-talk in economics and neuroscience," Post-Print ijn_00432665, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:ijn_00432665
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://jeannicod.ccsd.cnrs.fr/ijn_00432665
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    File URL: https://jeannicod.ccsd.cnrs.fr/ijn_00432665/document
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McCabe, Kevin A. & Rigdon, Mary L. & Smith, Vernon L., 2003. "Positive reciprocity and intentions in trust games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 267-275, October.
    2. Vernon L. Smith, 2003. "Constructivist and Ecological Rationality in Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(3), pages 465-508, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde, 2010. "Is neuroeconomics doomed by the reverse inference fallacy?," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 9(2), pages 229-249, December.

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