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What role for climate negotiations on technology transfer?

Author

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  • Matthieu Glachant

    () (CERNA i3 - Centre d'économie industrielle i3 - MINES ParisTech - École nationale supérieure des mines de Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Antoine Dechezleprêtre

    (CERNA i3 - Centre d'économie industrielle i3 - MINES ParisTech - École nationale supérieure des mines de Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Little progress has been made in climate negotiations on technology since 1992. Yet the diffusion of climate change mitigation technologies to developing countries (non-Annex I) has increased dramatically over the last twenty years. The shift has mostly concerned emerging economies, which are now reasonably well connected to international technology flows. This is good news, as the bulk of emissions increases are expected to take place in these countries in the near future. In contrast, the least developed countries still appear to be excluded from international technology flows, mostly because of their negligible participation in the recent economic globalization. This article focuses on the policy implications of the contribution of climate negotiations to international technology diffusion.Policy relevanceThe discrepancy between the small amount of progress made in climate negotiations on technology since 1992 and the steady increase in the international diffusion of climate mitigation technologies leads to the perhaps controversial view that the diffusion of climate mitigation technologies does not need strong international coordination over technology issues under the UNFCCC. However, climate negotiations can play a key role in stimulating the demand for low-carbon technologies by setting ambitious emission reductions targets and policies.
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Suggested Citation

  • Matthieu Glachant & Antoine Dechezleprêtre, 2016. "What role for climate negotiations on technology transfer?," Post-Print hal-01448497, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01448497
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01448497
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Keith E. Maskus, 2000. "Intellectual Property Rights in the Global Economy," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 99, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Clement Bonnet & Samuel Carcanague & Emmanuel Hache & Gondia Seck & Marine Simoën, 2019. "Vers une Géopolitique de l'énergie plus complexe ? Une analyse prospective tridimensionnelle de la transition énergétique," Working Papers hal-02971706, HAL.
    2. Julie Ing & Jean-Philippe Nicolai, 2019. "Dirty versus Clean Firms’ Relocation under International Trade and Imperfect Competition," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 19/319, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    3. Gosens, Jorrit, 2020. "The greening of South-South trade: Levels, growth, and specialization of trade in clean energy technologies between countries in the global South," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 931-943.
    4. Clément Bonnet & Samuel Carcanague & Emmanuel Hache & Gondia Sokhna Seck & Marine Simoën, 2018. "The nexus between climate negotiations and low-carbon innovation: a geopolitics of renewable energy patents," EconomiX Working Papers 2018-45, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    5. Martin Kalthaus, 2017. "Identifying technological sub-trajectories in photovoltaic patents," Jena Economic Research Papers 2017-010, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    6. Song, Malin & Zhu, Shuai & Wang, Jianlin & Zhao, Jiajia, 2020. "Share green growth: Regional evaluation of green output performance in China," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 219(C), pages 152-163.
    7. Emmanuel Hache & Samuel Carcanague & Clément Bonnet & Gondia Sokhna Seck & Marine Simoën, 2019. "Some geopolitical issues of the energy transition," Working Papers hal-03101697, HAL.
    8. Bruns, Stephan B. & Kalthaus, Martin, 2020. "Flexibility in the selection of patent counts: Implications for p-hacking and evidence-based policymaking," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(1).
    9. Damien Dussaux & Antoine Dechezleprêtre & Matthieu Glachant, 2017. "Intellectual property rights protection and the international transfer of low-carbon technologies," Working Papers hal-01693539, HAL.

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    Climate negotiations;

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