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Decentralization and electoral swings

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  • Ignacio Lago
  • André Blais

Abstract

We explore how the uniformity of electoral swings in the district vote within countries is affected by the level of economic and political decentralization. We rely on district-level data from OECD countries in two consecutive elections before and after the Great Recession to show that as regional governments exert more influence over the central government districts deviate less from the overall pattern of change in the support of the national incumbent party. The causal mechanism accounting for the effect of decentralization on dynamic nationalization is examined with individual panel data from national elections in Canada and Spain.

Suggested Citation

  • Ignacio Lago & André Blais, 2017. "Decentralization and electoral swings," Working Papers. Collection B: Regional and sectoral economics 1702, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:gov:wpregi:1702
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    File URL: http://infogen.webs.uvigo.es/WPB/WP1702.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Emilie Caldeira, 2012. "Does the System of Allocation of Intergovernmental Transfers in Senegal Eliminate Politically Motivated Targeting?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(2), pages 167-191, March.
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    3. repec:cup:apsrev:v:92:y:1998:i:02:p:329-342_21 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Arulampalam, Wiji & Dasgupta, Sugato & Dhillon, Amrita & Dutta, Bhaskar, 2009. "Electoral goals and center-state transfers: A theoretical model and empirical evidence from India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 103-119, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Decentralization; dynamic nationalization; electoral swing; Great Recession.;

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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