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Socio-economic exclusion as a hindrance of economic development. A comparative study for European countries

Author

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  • Ewa Lechman

    () (Gdansk University of Technology, Gdansk, Poland)

Abstract

In the paper we run an exhaustive study of the magnitude socio-economic exclusion which affects large parts of societies in European countries. Social and economic exclusion – alternatively called as deprivation – are widely recognized as symptoms of human poverty. This implies obstacles in gaining full and free access to education, professional health care, finance, or i.e. labor market, resulting in substantial lack of skills, capabilities and functionings (see Sen 1986). All these disable effective usage and allocation of resources, which constitutes a significant hindrance for economic development of countries. The aim of the analysis is to identify the magnitude of socio-economic deprivation (human poverty) and confront if with the economic development level (approximated by gross domestic product per capita) and dynamics in European countries. For quantitative assessment of the socio-economic deprivation level we apply a bundle of arbitrary chosen indicator derived from EUROSTAT databases. The sample covers European Union economies – with special focus on Baltic Sea region countries, and the time span for the analysis is 2004-2011.

Suggested Citation

  • Ewa Lechman, 2013. "Socio-economic exclusion as a hindrance of economic development. A comparative study for European countries," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 9, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:gdk:wpaper:9
    as

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    File URL: ftp://ftp.zie.pg.gda.pl/RePEc/gdk/wpaper/WP_GUTFME_A_9_Lechman.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Walter Bossert & Conchita D'Ambrosio & Vito Peragine, 2007. "Deprivation and Social Exclusion," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(296), pages 777-803, November.
    2. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
    3. Dasgupta, Partha, 1990. "Well-Being and the Extent of Its Realisation in Poor Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(400), pages 1-32, Supplemen.
    4. A. Atkinson, 2003. "Multidimensional Deprivation: Contrasting Social Welfare and Counting Approaches," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 1(1), pages 51-65, April.
    5. Luna Bellani & Conchita D’Ambrosio, 2011. "Deprivation, Social Exclusion and Subjective Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 67-86, October.
    6. Joseph Chan & Ho-Pong To & Elaine Chan, 2006. "Reconsidering Social Cohesion: Developing a Definition and Analytical Framework for Empirical Research," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 75(2), pages 273-302, January.
    7. Sen, Amartya K, 1976. "Poverty: An Ordinal Approach to Measurement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(2), pages 219-231, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Luann Good Gingrich & Naomi Lightman, 2015. "The Empirical Measurement of a Theoretical Concept: Tracing Social Exclusion among Racial Minority and Migrant Groups in Canada," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 3(4), pages 98-111.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    social exclusion; economic exclusion; deprivation; poverty; economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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