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Evaluating contemporary social exclusion in Europe: a hierarchical latent class approach

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  • Elena Pirani

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Abstract

In recent years, the concept of social exclusion has received a renewed attention in scientific research, as well as in politics. In this contribution we propose a hierarchical Latent Class (LC) model for the analysis of differences and similarities about experiences and perceptions of social exclusion among European regions. Social exclusion is a situation that affects individuals, and derives from a multidimensional deprivation in several domains of life. In particular, we identify and define an economic, a social and an institutional dimension. The LCs, which structure the individuals with respect to a set of observed indicators, represent different typologies of social exclusion at individual level according to the three identified dimensions. The regional differences in the latent variable distribution are modeled following a nonparametric approach for the random effects. This multilevel extension leads to the identification of a typology of regions, allowing different social exclusion structures to stand out for different European areas. The hierarchical latent class approach proves to be profitable in investigating the relevance of different risk factors of social exclusion and their relationships, and in verifying whether, and to what extent, the same risks and disadvantages determine the same perception of marginalization and exclusion in different political, economic, social and cultural contexts. The analysis is carried out using the 56.1-2001 Eurobarometer Survey, which focused on poverty and social exclusion situations, from both a subjective and an objective point of view. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Elena Pirani, 2013. "Evaluating contemporary social exclusion in Europe: a hierarchical latent class approach," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 923-941, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:qualqt:v:47:y:2013:i:2:p:923-941
    DOI: 10.1007/s11135-011-9574-2
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11135-011-9574-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Walter Bossert & Conchita D'Ambrosio & Vito Peragine, 2007. "Deprivation and Social Exclusion," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(296), pages 777-803, November.
    2. Daniele Vignoli & Gustavo Santis, 2010. "Individual and Contextual Correlates of Economic Difficulties in Old Age in Europe," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(4), pages 481-501, August.
    3. Pasi Moisio, 2004. "A Latent Class Application to the Multidimensional Measurement of Poverty," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 38(6), pages 703-717, December.
    4. Caroline Dewilde, 2004. "The Multidimensional Measurement of Poverty in Belgium and Britain: A Categorical Approach," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 68(3), pages 331-369, September.
    5. Joseph Deutsch & Jacques Silber, 2005. "Measuring Multidimensional Poverty: An Empirical Comparison Of Various Approaches," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 51(1), pages 145-174, March.
    6. Anthony B. Atkinson & Eric Marlier & Brian Nolan, 2004. "Indicators and Targets for Social Inclusion in the European Union," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(1), pages 47-75, February.
    7. Rob Atkinson & Simin da Voudi, 2000. "The Concept of Social Exclusion in the European Union: Context, Development and Possibilities," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(3), pages 427-448, September.
    8. Caroline Dewilde, 2008. "Individual and institutional determinants of multidimensional poverty: A European comparison," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 86(2), pages 233-256, April.
    9. Costa, Michele, 2002. "A multidimensional approach to the measurement of poverty," IRISS Working Paper Series 2002-05, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
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    Cited by:

    1. Leonor Costa & José Dias, 2015. "What do Europeans Believe to be the Causes of Poverty? A Multilevel Analysis of Heterogeneity Within and Between Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(1), pages 1-20, May.
    2. Luann Good Gingrich & Naomi Lightman, 2015. "The Empirical Measurement of a Theoretical Concept: Tracing Social Exclusion among Racial Minority and Migrant Groups in Canada," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 3(4), pages 98-111.
    3. repec:spr:soinre:v:140:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1817-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Daniele Vignoli & Elena Pirani & Silvana Salvini, 2014. "Family Constellations and Life Satisfaction in Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 967-986, July.

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