IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fth/callaa/98-005.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Education for All: Policy Lessons from High-Achieving Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Mehrotra, S.

Abstract

This paper draws upon case studies of countries which universalised primary schooling early in their development process and rapidly increased secondary enrolments thereafter: Sri Lanka and Kerala state (India) from South Asia; Republic of Korea and Malaysia in East Asia; Botswana, Mauritius and Zimbabwe in Sub-Saharan Africa; and Barbados, Costa Rica and Cuba in Latin America and the Caribbean. It examines the common elements of social, and specifically, education policy among these high achievers, and also evaluates the policy lessons for other developing countries from the experience of these countries. The supply and demand side factors which help in explaining this success are compared with the situation prevailing in the rest of the developing world.

Suggested Citation

  • Mehrotra, S., 1998. "Education for All: Policy Lessons from High-Achieving Countries," Papers 98-005, California Los Angeles - Applied Econometrics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:callaa:98-005
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Smith, William C. & Joshi, Devin K., 2016. "Public vs. private schooling as a route to universal basic education: A comparison of China and India," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 153-165.
    2. Roland Craigwell & Danielle Bynoe & Shane Lowe, 2012. "The effectiveness of government expenditure on education and health care in the Caribbean," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 4-18, April.
    3. Santosh Mehrotra & Enrique Delamonica, 2002. "Public spending for children: an empirical note," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(8), pages 1105-1116.
    4. Barbara Bruns & Alain Mingat & Ramahatra Rakotomalala, 2003. "Achieving Universal Primary Education by 2015 : A Chance for Every Child," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15121.
    5. Seid, Yared, 2016. "Does learning in mother tongue matter? Evidence from a natural experiment in Ethiopia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 21-38.
    6. Gupta, Sanjeev & Verhoeven, Marijn & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2002. "The effectiveness of government spending on education and health care in developing and transition economies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 717-737, November.
    7. Aline Coudouel & Stefano Paternostro, 2005. "Analyzing the Distributional Impact of Reforms : A Practioner's Guide to Trade, Monetary and Exchange Rate Policy, Utility Provision, Agricultural Markets, Land Policy and Education, Volume 1," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7251.
    8. Santosh Mehrotra, 2006. "Governance and basic social services: ensuring accountability in service delivery through deep democratic decentralization," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 263-283.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    EDUCATION ; MANAGEMENT;

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:callaa:98-005. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deuclus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.