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Credible Implementation

Author

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  • Chakravorti, B.
  • Corchon, L.C.

Abstract

The theory of mechanism design and implementation abounds with clever mechanisms whose equilibrium outcomes are optimal according to some social choice rule. However, the cleverness of these mechanisms relies on intricate systems of rewards and punishments off-the-equilibrium path. Generally, it is not in the designer's best interest to go through with the reward/punishment in the "subgame" arising from some disequilibrium play. This would make the mechanism's outcome function non-credible. In the context of exchange economies, we define an appropiate notion of "credible" implementation and show that (a) the non-dictatorial Pareto correspondence can be crediblyimplemented (b) there exists no credibly implementable Pareto-efficient and individually rational social choice rule and (c) there exists no credibly implementable fair social choice rules. We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for credible implementability of choice rules. The main implication is paradoxical: it is suboptimal for the designer to be endowed with "too much" information about the economy. Finally, we show that the negative results persist even under weaker credibility requirements .
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Suggested Citation

  • Chakravorti, B. & Corchon, L.C., 1992. "Credible Implementation," Papers 76, Bell Communications - Economic Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:bellco:76
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    Cited by:

    1. Carmen Herrero, 1997. "Endogenous reference points and the adjusted proportional solution for bargaining problems with claims," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 15(1), pages 113-119.
    2. Amoros, Pablo, 2004. "Nash implementation and uncertain renegotiation," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 424-434, November.
    3. José Alcalde, 1994. "Exchange-proofness or divorce-proofness? Stability in one-sided matching markets," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 1(1), pages 275-287, December.
    4. Begoña Subiza Martínez, 1993. "Numerical Representation Of Acyclic Preferences," Working Papers. Serie AD 1993-09, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    5. Luciano I. Castro & Zhiwei Liu & Nicholas C. Yannelis, 2017. "Ambiguous implementation: the partition model," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 63(1), pages 233-261, January.
    6. Arieli, Itai & Babichenko, Yakov & Tennenholtz, Moshe, 2017. "Sequential commitment games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 297-315.
    7. Luis Corchón & Andreu Mas-Colell, 1995. "A Note On Stability Of Best Reply And Gradient Systems With Applications To Imperfectly Competitive Models," Working Papers. Serie AD 1995-18, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    8. Maskin, Eric & Sjostrom, Tomas, 2002. "Implementation theory," Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare, in: K. J. Arrow & A. K. Sen & K. Suzumura (ed.), Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5, pages 237-288, Elsevier.
    9. Matthew O. Jackson & Thomas R. Palfrey, 1998. "Efficiency and Voluntary Implementation in Markets with Repeated Pairwise Bargaining," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(6), pages 1353-1388, November.
    10. Nikolai S. Kukushkin, 1993. "Cournot Oligopoly With "Almost" Identical Convex Costs," Working Papers. Serie AD 1993-07, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    11. Matthew O. Jackson, 2001. "A crash course in implementation theory," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 18(4), pages 655-708.
    12. Maskin, Eric & Sjostrom, Tomas, 2002. "Implementation theory," Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare,in: K. J. Arrow & A. K. Sen & K. Suzumura (ed.), Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5, pages 237-288 Elsevier.
    13. Bevia, Carmen & Corchon, Luis, 1995. "On the Generic Impossibility of Truthful Behavior: A Simple Approach," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 6(2), pages 365-371, July.
    14. Carmen Bevi?Author-Email: Carmen.Bevia@uab.es & Luis C. Corch?n & Simon Wilkie, "undated". "Implementation of the Walrasian Correspondence by Market Games," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 493.01, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    15. Gonzalo Olcina Vauteren & Amparo Urbano Salvador, 1993. "INTROSPECTION AND EQUILIBRIUM SELECTION IN 2x2 MATRIX GAMES," Working Papers. Serie AD 1993-01, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    16. Corchón, Luis C., 2008. "The theory of implementation : what did we learn?," UC3M Working papers. Economics we081207, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    17. John Conley & Simon Wilkie, 1994. "Implementing the nash extension bargaining solution for non-convex problems," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 1(1), pages 205-216, December.
    18. Tomas Sjöstrω, 1996. "Credibility And Renegotiation Of Outcome Functions In Implementation," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 157-169, June.
    19. Martín Browning, 1993. "Dual approaches to utility," Working Papers. Serie AD 1993-10, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    20. Fernando Vega Redondo, 1993. "Industrial Dynamics, Path-Dependence And Technological Change," Working Papers. Serie AD 1993-04, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    21. María Dolores Guilló, 1995. "Terms-Of-Trade And The Current Account: A Two-Country/Two-Sector Growth Model," Working Papers. Serie AD 1995-03, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    22. Burkart, Olivier, 1993. "Renegotiation -and coalition- proof virtual Nash implementation," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 9322, CEPREMAP.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic equilibrium ; game theory;

    JEL classification:

    • C70 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - General
    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General

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