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Gender differences in mobilization for collective action: case studies of villages in Northern Nigeria

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  • Abdulwahid, Saratu

Abstract

"Men and women participate in collective action for different purposes in northern Nigeria. Field work conducted in six villages show that while men engage in community activities such as road repairs, maintenance of schools and hospitals, refuse collection and maintenance of the traditional village government, women mobilize around activities such as savings, house and farm work and care giving. It is argued that men mobilize around community activities outside the home because of their public orientation and because they want to maintain their dominance of that space. Women, in contrast, mobilize around activities in keeping with their domestic orientation and traditional roles such as care giving and housework. Religion also influences the extent of women's participation in collective action. Because men have command of community institutions, they are better able to access the resources embedded in these institutions, but women are able to negotiate within established social structures for better conditions. Given the socio-cultural characteristics of communities in northern Nigeria, an effective strategy for collective action is collaboration between men's and women's groups rather than separatism or integration." Authors' Abstract

Suggested Citation

  • Abdulwahid, Saratu, 2006. "Gender differences in mobilization for collective action: case studies of villages in Northern Nigeria," CAPRi working papers 58, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:worpps:58
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    File URL: http://www.capri.cgiar.org/pdf/capriwp58.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fox, Jonathan, 1996. "How does civil society thicken? the political construction of social capital in rural Mexico," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1089-1103, June.
    2. Narayan, Deepa & Pritchett, Lant, 1999. "Cents and Sociability: Household Income and Social Capital in Rural Tanzania," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(4), pages 871-897, July.
    3. Petro, Nicolai N., 2001. "Creating Social Capital in Russia: The Novgorod Model," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 229-244, February.
    4. Ostrom, Elinor, 1996. "Crossing the great divide: Coproduction, synergy, and development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1073-1087, June.
    5. Krishna, Anirudh, 2001. "Moving from the Stock of Social Capital to the Flow of Benefits: The Role of Agency," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 925-943, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pandolfelli, Lauren & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Dohrn, Stephan, 2007. "Gender and collective action: A conceptual framework for analysis," CAPRi working papers 64, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Prata, Ndola & Ejembi, Clara & Fraser, Ashley & Shittu, Oladapo & Minkler, Meredith, 2012. "Community mobilization to reduce postpartum hemorrhage in home births in northern Nigeria," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(8), pages 1288-1296.
    3. Arjan Verschoor & Bereket Kebede & Alistair Munro & Marcela Tarazona, 2017. "Spousal Control and Efficiency of Intra-Household Decision Making: Experiments among Married Couples in India, Ethiopia and Nigeria," GRIPS Discussion Papers 16-31, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    4. Adedayo, A.G. & Oyun, M.B. & Kadeba, O., 2010. "Access of rural women to forest resources and its impact on rural household welfare in North Central Nigeria," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(6), pages 439-450, July.

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