IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A gendered 1993-94 Social Accounting Matrix for Bangladesh


  • Fontana, Marzia
  • Wobst, Peter


This working paper documents the construction of a 1993-94 Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) for Bangladesh. The SAM distinguishes 10 agricultural sectors —including two different kinds of rice technology — and 19 manufacturing sectors, out of 43 sectors in total. It also differentiates between twelve socio-economic groups, allowing detailed analysis of household welfare and poverty. The SAM has ten factors of production: one type of capital, one type of land and eight different types of labor which are disaggregated by both level of education and gender. The innovative feature of the SAM is that it separates out female and male labor value-added for each educational level and in eachsector of the economy, providing a base for gender-sensitive analyses of policy changes. The SAM is estimated with a cross-entropy approach, which makes efficient use of all available data in a framework that incorporates prior information and constraints.

Suggested Citation

  • Fontana, Marzia & Wobst, Peter, 2001. "A gendered 1993-94 Social Accounting Matrix for Bangladesh," TMD discussion papers 74, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:74

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fontana, Marzia & Wood, Adrian, 2000. "Modeling the Effects of Trade on Women, at Work and at Home," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1173-1190, July.
    2. Sherman Robinson & Andrea Cattaneo & Moataz El-Said, 2001. "Updating and Estimating a Social Accounting Matrix Using Cross Entropy Methods," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 47-64.
    3. Golan, Amos & Judge, George & Robinson, Sherman, 1994. "Recovering Information from Incomplete or Partial Multisectoral Economic Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(3), pages 541-549, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. John Gilbert & Nilanjan Banik, 2012. "Socio-economic impacts of regional transport infrastructure in South Asia," Chapters,in: Infrastructure for Asian Connectivity, chapter 5, pages 139-163 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. John Gilbert & Nilanjan Banik, 2010. "Socioeconomic Impacts of Cross- Border Transport Infrastructure Development in South Asia," Development Economics Working Papers 21803, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    3. Filipski, Mateusz & Aboudrare, Abdellah & Lybbert, Travis J. & Taylor, J. Edward, 2015. "Spice Price Spikes: Simulating Gendered Impacts of a Saffron Boom and Bust in Rural Mexico," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 229066, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Matthias Kalkuhl & Ottmar Edenhofer, 2016. "Knowing the Damages is not Enough: The General Equilibrium Impacts of Climate Change," CESifo Working Paper Series 5862, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Kalkuhl, Matthias & Edenhofer, Ottmar, 2015. "Deforestation, Land Taxes and Development," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112961, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Filipski, Mateusz & Aboudrare, Abdellah & Lybbert, Travis J. & Taylor, J. Edward, 2017. "Spice Price Spikes: Simulating Impacts of Saffron Price Volatility in a Gendered Local Economy-Wide Model," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 84-99.
    7. John Gilbert, 2008. "Trade Policy, Poverty, and Income Distribution in CGE Models: An Application to SAFTA," Working Papers 2008-02, Utah State University, Department of Economics, revised 19 Dec 2008.
    8. Pauw, Kalie, 2005. "Forming Representative Household and Factor Groups for a South African SAM," Technical Paper Series 15620, PROVIDE Project.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:74. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.