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Poverty-focused social accounting matrices for Tanzania

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  • Thurlow, James
  • Wobst, Peter

Abstract

The development of effective and sustainable economic policies for Tanzania requires access to appropriate databases. One such database is a social accounting matrix (SAM) that details the structure of the entire economy, taking into account the patterns of production and demand, and various institutional relationships. Prior to this study the most recent SAM for mainland Tanzania was for 1992 and was based on past household budget and labor force surveys. Following the release of newer versions of these two surveys as well as a new input-output table for 1992, it is desirable to construct a new SAM for the country. Furthermore, given that Tanzania is committed to reducing national poverty, it is necessary that this new SAM is able to address questions related to poverty and inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Thurlow, James & Wobst, Peter, 2003. "Poverty-focused social accounting matrices for Tanzania," TMD discussion papers 112, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:112
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/tmdp112.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sherman Robinson & Andrea Cattaneo & Moataz El-Said, 2001. "Updating and Estimating a Social Accounting Matrix Using Cross Entropy Methods," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 47-64.
    2. Robinson, Sherman & Roland-Holst, David W., 1988. "Macroeconomic structure and computable general equilibrium models," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 353-375.
    3. Löfgren, Hans & Harris, Rebecca Lee & Robinson, Sherman, 2001. "A standard computable general equilibrium (CGE) model in GAMS," TMD discussion papers 75, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Pyatt, Graham, 1988. "A SAM approach to modeling," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 327-352.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sònia Muñoz & Stanley Sang-Wook Cho, 2003. "Social Impact of a Tax Reform; The Case of Ethiopia," IMF Working Papers 03/232, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Latorre, María C., 2016. "A CGE Analysis of the Impact of Foreign Direct Investment and Tariff Reform on Female and Male Workers in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 346-366.
    3. Marcos Esaú Domínguez Viera, 2009. "Aplicación de un modelo de multiplicadores contables y de análisis estructural a políticas sociales seleccionadas en el estado de Nuevo León," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(2), pages 95-137, November.
    4. Pauw, Karl & Thurlow, James, 2011. "Agricultural growth, poverty, and nutrition in Tanzania," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 795-804.
    5. repec:taf:jdevst:v:52:y:2016:i:5:p:665-680 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Parra, Juan Carlos & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "How Does Growth Affect Labor Income by Gender? A Structural Path Analysis for Tanzania," MPRA Paper 27735, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Matthias Kalkuhl & Ottmar Edenhofer, 2016. "Knowing the Damages is not Enough: The General Equilibrium Impacts of Climate Change," CESifo Working Paper Series 5862, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Glomsrød, Solveig & Wei, Taoyuan & Liu, Gang & Aune, Jens B., 2011. "How well do tree plantations comply with the twin targets of the Clean Development Mechanism? -- The case of tree plantations in Tanzania," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(6), pages 1066-1074, April.
    9. Dessus, Sebastien, 2008. "The short and longer term potential welfare impact of global commodity inflation in Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4760, The World Bank.
    10. repec:eee:wdevel:v:109:y:2018:i:c:p:497-510 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Conforti, Piero & Sarris, Alexander H., 2009. "Commodity prices, structural constraints and food price shocks in Tanzania," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51905, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. Wobst, Peter & Thurlow, James, 2005. "The Road to Pro-Poor Growth in Zambia: Past Lessons and Future Challenges," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Kiel 2005 37, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    13. Mintewab Bezabih & Muyeye Chambwera & Jesper Stage, 2011. "Climate change and total factor productivity in the Tanzanian economy," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(6), pages 1289-1302, November.
    14. Bezabih, Mintewab & Chambwera, Muyeye & Stage, Jesper, 2010. "Climate Change, Total Factor Productivity, and the Tanzanian Economy: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Discussion Papers dp-10-14-efd, Resources For the Future.
    15. Jensen, Jesper & Tarr, David G., 2010. "Regional trade policy options for Tanzania : the importance of services commitments," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5481, The World Bank.
    16. Fichera, Eleonora & Savage, David, 2015. "Income and Health in Tanzania. An Instrumental Variable Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 500-515.
    17. Faße, Anja & Winter, Etti & Grote, Ulrike, 2014. "Bioenergy and rural development: The role of agroforestry in a Tanzanian village economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 155-166.
    18. Ahmed , Syud Amer & Diffenbaugh, Noah S. & Hertel , Thomas W. & Lobell, David B. & Ramankutty, Navin & Rios, Ana R. & Rowhani, Pedram, 2009. "Climate volatility and poverty vulnerability in Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5117, The World Bank.
    19. Adam, Christopher & Bevan, David & Gollin, Douglas, 2018. "Rural–Urban Linkages, Public Investment and Transport Costs: The Case of Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 497-510.
    20. McDonald, Scott & Punt, Cecilia, 2005. "General equilibrium modelling in South Africa: What the future holds," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 0(Issue 1), pages 1-39, March.
    21. Levin, Jörgen & Olin, Mikael, 2008. "Trade Policies and Export growth - employment and poverty impact in Tanzania," Working Papers 2008:1, Örebro University, School of Business.
    22. Kalkuhl, Matthias & Edenhofer, Ottmar, 2015. "Deforestation, Land Taxes and Development," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112961, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    23. Pauw, Kalie, 2005. "Forming Representative Household and Factor Groups for a South African SAM," Technical Paper Series 15620, PROVIDE Project.
    24. Hannah Schuerenberg-Frosch, 2015. "How to Model a Child in School? A Dynamic Macrosimulation Study for Tanzania," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 83(1), pages 117-139, March.

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    Keywords

    Social accounting Tanzania ; Poverty alleviation ; economic policies ;

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