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Institutional and public expenditure review of Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture

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  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara
  • Birner, Regina
  • Benin, Samuel
  • Horowitz, Leah
  • Babu, Suresh
  • Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo
  • Thompson, Nii Moi
  • Poku, John

Abstract

The need for agricultural ministries to have the capacity to develop appropriate policies and effectively implement them is becoming increasingly important as African countries, following on their commitment to Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Program (CAADP), pursue economic growth through agriculture-led development. The ministries need to take the lead in pulling together evidence based strategies and building partnerships that ensures their ownership. As donors begin to align their policies with those of governments, an increasingly large share of external support to agriculture is likely to be delivered in the form of support to budgets rather than specially implemented projects. Capacities of ministries and effectiveness public systems will have significant bearing on effectiveness and impact of investments in agriculture. This public expenditure and institutional review of Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture offers insights on diagnosing limitations to and identifying strategies for improving the capacity of ministries to make effective use of human and financial resources. The review makes use a conceptual framework in which mission and functions, organizational capacity – a combination of structures, processes and resources –and organizational incentives interact to produce organizational performance. Indicative strategies are recommended that the ministry can use to generate discussions internally and developed a set a reforms that are owned. They key message is that to improve performance both capacity and incentives faced by organizations need to be addressed.

Suggested Citation

  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Birner, Regina & Benin, Samuel & Horowitz, Leah & Babu, Suresh & Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Thompson, Nii Moi & Poku, John, 2010. "Institutional and public expenditure review of Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture," IFPRI discussion papers 1020, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Quartey, 2005. "Innovative ways of making aid effective in Ghana: tied aid versus direct budgetary support," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(8), pages 1077-1092.
    2. Shenggen Fan & Xiaobo Zhang, 2008. "Public Expenditure, Growth and Poverty Reduction in Rural Uganda," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 20(3), pages 466-496.
    3. Benin, Samuel & Mogues, Tewodaj & Cudjoe, Godsway & Randriamamonjy, Josee, 2008. "Reaching middle-income status in Ghana by 2015: Public expenditures and agricultural growth," IFPRI discussion papers 811, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Charles Lusthaus & Fred Carden & Marie-Hélène Adrien & Gary Anderson & George Plinio Montalván, 2002. "Organizational Assessment: A Framework for Improving Performance," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 79941, February.
    5. Babu, Suresh Chandra & Mensah, Raymond & Kolavalli, Shashi L., 2007. "Does training strengthen capacity?: Lessons from capacity development in Ghana, Ministry of Food and Agriculture," GSSP working papers 9, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Mogues, Tewodaj & Benin, Samuel, 2012. "Do External Grants to District Governments Discourage Own Revenue Generation? A Look at Local Public Finance Dynamics in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 1054-1067.
    7. Breisinger, Clemens & Diao, Xinshen & Thurlow, James & Al-Hassan, Ramatu M., 2008. "Agriculture for development in Ghana: New opportunities and challenges," IFPRI discussion papers 784, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Resnick, Danielle & Mather, David, 2016. "Agricultural Inputs Policy Under Macroeconomic Uncertainty: Applying The Kaleidoscope Model To Ghana’S Fertilizer Subsidy Programme (2008–2015)," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 259059, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    2. Resnick, Danielle & Mather, David, 2016. "Agricultural inputs policy under macroeconomic uncertainty: Applying the kaleidoscope model to Ghana’s Fertilizer Subsidy Programme (2008–2015):," IFPRI discussion papers 1551, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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    Keywords

    agriculture; ministry; capacity; expenditure review; institutions;
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