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The transition from a-pay-as-you-go to a fully-funded Social Security System: is there a role for social insurance?

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  • Patricia S. Pollard
  • Rowena A. Pecchenino

Abstract

This paper develops a model to examine the effects of introducing a fully-funded government sponsored pension plan into an overlapping generations model with an extant pay-as-you-go social security system. We examine whether individual and social welfare can be improved by phasing out the current pay-as-you-go system and replacing it with a fully-funded system in which pension benefits are at least partially annuitized. Furthermore, we consider the effects of means testing social security benefits and providing a income guarantee funded in a pay-as-you-go manner. We find that the presence of risky investments increases the likelihood that the maintenance of a portion of the pay-as-you-go system, through a minimum retirement income guarantee, will be welfare improving.

Suggested Citation

  • Patricia S. Pollard & Rowena A. Pecchenino, 1998. "The transition from a-pay-as-you-go to a fully-funded Social Security System: is there a role for social insurance?," Working Papers 1997-022, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:1997-022
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Gilles Saint-Paul, 1992. "Fiscal Policy in an Endogenous Growth Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1243-1259.
    3. Laitner, John & Juster, F Thomas, 1996. "New Evidence on Altruism: A Study of TIAA-CREF Retirees," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 893-908, September.
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    5. Hamermesh, Daniel S & Menchik, Paul L, 1987. "Planned and Unplanned Bequests," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 25(1), pages 55-66, January.
    6. Altonji, Joseph G & Hayashi, Fumio & Kotlikoff, Laurence J, 1992. "Is the Extended Family Altruistically Linked? Direct Tests Using Micro Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1177-1198, December.
    7. Pecchenino, Rowena A & Pollard, Patricia S, 1997. "The Effects of Annuities, Bequests, and Aging in an Overlapping Generations Model of Endogenous Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 26-46, January.
    8. Townley, Peter G. C. & Boadway, Robin W., 1988. "Social security and the failure of annuity markets," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 75-96, February.
    9. King, Robert G & Rebelo, Sergio, 1990. "Public Policy and Economic Growth: Developing Neoclassical Implications," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 126-150, October.
    10. Eckstein, Zvi & Eichenbaum, Martin & Peled, Dan, 1985. "Uncertain lifetimes and the welfare enhancing properties of annuity markets and social security," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 303-326, April.
    11. Samuelson, Paul A, 1975. "Optimum Social Security in a Life-Cycle Growth Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 16(3), pages 539-544, October.
    12. Abel, Andrew B, 1986. "Capital Accumulation and Uncertain Lifetimes with Adverse Selection," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(5), pages 1079-1097, September.
    13. Eytan Sheshinski & Yoram Weiss, 1981. "Uncertainty and Optimal Social Security Systems," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 96(2), pages 189-206.
    14. Auerbach, A.J. & Kotlikoff, L.J. & Weil, D.N., 1992. "The Increasing Annuitization of the Elderly - Estimates and Implications for Intergenerational Transfers, Inequality and National Saving," Papers 6, Boston University - Department of Economics.
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    Keywords

    Social security;

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