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Does bank concentration lead to concentration in industrial sectors?

  • Nicola Cetorelli

This paper explores the effect of banking market structure on the market structure of industrial sectors. It asks whether concentration in the banking market promotes the formation of industries constituted by a few, large firms, or rather, whether it facilitates the continuous entry of new firms, thus maintaining unconcentrated market structures across industries. Theoretical arguments could be made to support either hypotethical scenario. Empirical evidence is derived from a sample of 35 manufacturing industries in 17 OECD countries, adopting a methodology that allows controlling for other determinants of industry market structure common across industries or across countries. Bank concentration is found to enhance industries' market concentration, especially in sectors highly dependent on external finance. Such effect is however weaker in countries characterized by higher overall financial development.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago in its series Proceedings with number 818.

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Length: 509-535
Date of creation: 2002
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Conference on Bank Structure and Competition (2002 : 38th) ; Financial market behavior and appropriate regulation over the business cycle
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhpr:818
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  1. Mark G. Guzman, 1999. "Bank structure, capital accumulation and growth: a simple macroeconomic model," Working Papers 9907, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  2. Emilia Bonaccorsi Di Patti & Giovanni Dell'Ariccia, 2003. "Bank competition and firm creation," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 481, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  3. Rajan, Raghuram G & Zingales, Luigi, 1998. "Financial Dependence and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 559-86, June.
  4. Sherril Shaffer, 1997. "The winner's curse in banking," Working Papers 97-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  5. Rafael LaPorta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, . "Legal Determinants of External Finance," Working Paper 19443, Harvard University OpenScholar.
  6. Manove, Michael & Padilla, Atilano Jorge & Pagano, Marco, 2000. "Collateral Vs. Project Screening: A Model Of Lazy Banks," CEPR Discussion Papers 2439, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Krishna B. Kumar & Raghuram G. Rajan & Luigi Zingales, 1999. "What Determines Firm Size?," NBER Working Papers 7208, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Cetorelli, Nicola & Peretto, Pietro F., 2000. "Oligopoly Banking and Capital Accumulation," Working Papers 00-19, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  9. Petersen, Mitchell A & Rajan, Raghuram G, 1995. "The Effect of Credit Market Competition on Lending Relationships," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(2), pages 407-43, May.
  10. Melanie Cao & Shouyong Shi, 2000. "Screening, Bidding, and the Loan Market Tightness," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 00-09, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
  11. Nicola Cetorelli & Michele Gambera, 1999. "Banking market structure, financial dependence and growth: international evidence from industry data," Working Paper Series WP-99-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  12. Klepper, Steven, 1996. "Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 562-83, June.
  13. Barth, James R. & Caprio, Gerard & Levine, Ross, 2000. "Banking systems around the globe : do regulation and ownership affect the performance and stability?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2325, The World Bank.
  14. Giovanni Dell & Ariccia#x2019, 2000. "Learning by Lending, Competition, and Screening Incentives in the Banking Industry," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 00-10, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
  15. Pagano, Marco, 1993. "Financial markets and growth: An overview," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 613-622, April.
  16. Joaquim Oliveira Martins & Stefano Scarpetta & Dirk Pilat, 1996. "Mark-Up Ratios in Manufacturing Industries: Estimates for 14 OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 162, OECD Publishing.
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