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Monetary policy and regional house-price appreciation

Author

Listed:
  • Cooper, Daniel H.

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of Boston)

  • Luengo-Prado, Maria Jose

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of Boston)

  • Olivei, Giovanni P.

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of Boston)

Abstract

This paper examines the link between monetary policy and house-price appreciation by exploiting the fact that monetary policy is set at the national level, but has different effects on state-level activity in the United States. This differential impact of monetary policy provides an exogenous source of variation that can be used to assess the effect of monetary policy on state-level housing prices. Policy accommodation equivalent to 100 basis points on an equilibrium real federal funds rate basis raises housing prices by about 2.5 percent over the next two years. However, the estimated effect increases to 6.6 percent during the early 2000s housing boom.

Suggested Citation

  • Cooper, Daniel H. & Luengo-Prado, Maria Jose & Olivei, Giovanni P., 2016. "Monetary policy and regional house-price appreciation," Working Papers 16-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbwp:16-18
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Beraja & Erik Hurst & Juan Ospina, 2016. "The Aggregate Implications of Regional Business Cycles," NBER Working Papers 21956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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