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Do bank mergers affect Federal Reserve check volume?

  • Joanna Stavins
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    The recent decline in the Federal Reserve’s check volumes has received a lot of attention. Although switching to electronic payments methods and electronic check-processing has been credited for much of that decline, some of it could be caused by changes following bank mergers involving Federal Reserve customer banks. This paper evaluates the effect of bank mergers on Federal Reserve check-processing volumes. ; Using inflow-outflow and regression methods, we find that mergers between two or more Reserve Bank customers have resulted in volume losses, especially during the first quarter following the merger. On average, the estimated cumulative loss of volume during the first five post-merger quarters was 2.6 million checks. While the overall number of checks in the United States has declined during the past few years, the Federal Reserve has lost additional check-processing volume because of bank mergers.

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    File URL: http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/ppdp/2004/ppdp0407.htm
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    Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Boston in its series Public Policy Discussion Paper with number 04-7.

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    Date of creation: 2004
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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbpp:04-7
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    1. Rhoades, Stephen A., 1998. "The efficiency effects of bank mergers: An overview of case studies of nine mergers," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 273-291, March.
    2. Paul S. Calem & Leonard I. Nakamura, 1995. "Branch banking and the geography of bank pricing," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 95-25, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Allen N. Berger & David B. Humphrey, 1997. "Efficiency of financial institutions: international survey and directions for future research," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Allen N. Berger & Seth D. Bonime & Lawrence G. Goldberg & Lawrence J. White, 2000. "The Dynamics of Market Entry: The Effects of Mergers and Acquisitions on De Novo Entry and Small Business Lending in the Banking Industry," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 00-12, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    5. Berger, Allen N. & Demsetz, Rebecca S. & Strahan, Philip E., 1999. "The consolidation of the financial services industry: Causes, consequences, and implications for the future," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(2-4), pages 135-194, February.
    6. Prager, Robin A & Hannan, Timothy H, 1998. "Do Substantial Horizontal Mergers Generate Significant Price Effects? Evidence from the Banking Industry," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 433-52, December.
    7. Katerina Simons & Joanna Stavins, 1998. "Has antitrust policy in banking become obsolete?," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 13-26.
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