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Infant disease, economic conditions at birth and adult stature in Brazil

  • Víctor Hugo de Oliveira Sila
  • Climent Quintana

We empirically assess the role of environmental conditions at birth, namely, infant mortality (IMR), GDP per capita and income inequality in the year of birth in explaining average adult height for cohorts born between 1950 and 1980 in 20 Brazilian states. We find that there is a strong positive correlation between GDP per capita and adult height, even after controlling for: secular changes affecting both GDP per capita and adult height, constant differences across states, income inequality and IMR in the year of birth. The drop in IMR does not appear to be a relevant factor in explaining the Brazilian increase in average height. Moreover, IMR could have had a positive impact on average height of non-white women through selection: non-white women who survived in a year of birth with high IMR appear to be taller when they reach adulthood. We also find that income inequality in the year of birth is negatively associated with the average adult height of non-white women. While recent findings for a developed country like Spain suggest that disease, not food availability, was the constraining factor of human growth, at least after 1969, in Brazil, a developing country, food availability, not disease, appears to have been the constraining factor, at least after 1950.

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File URL: http://documentos.fedea.net/pubs/dt/2009/dt-2009-33.pdf
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Paper provided by FEDEA in its series Working Papers with number 2009-33.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
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Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2009-33
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  9. Carlos Bozzoli & Angus Deaton & Climent Quintana, 2008. "Adult height and childhood disease," Working Papers 2008-25, FEDEA.
    • Carlos Bozzoli & Angus Deaton & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2008. "Adult height and childhood disease," Working Papers 1119, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
  10. Denisard Alves & Walter Belluzzo, 2005. "Child Health and Infant Mortality in Brazil," Research Department Publications 3187, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  11. Steckel, Richard H., 2005. "Young adult mortality following severe physiological stress in childhood: Skeletal evidence," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 314-328, July.
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  15. Mariano Bosch & Carlos Bozzoli & Climent Quintana, 2009. "Infant mortality, income and adult stature in Spain," Working Papers 2009-27, FEDEA.
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