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Concentrating Solar Power in China and India: A Spatial Analysis of Technical Potential and the Cost of Deployment


  • Kevin Ummel


This study provides an in-depth assessment of Concentrating solar power (CSP) potential in China and India using high-resolution spatial data for site selection and modeling of plant performance, assessment of alternative land-use scenarios, estimation of generating costs, and simulation of transmission requirements. The results are used to estimate the costs and Green House Gas (GHG) abatement of an illustrative CSP expansion program that provides 20 per cent of Chinese and Indian electricity by midcentury. [Working Paper No. 219].

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  • Kevin Ummel, 2010. "Concentrating Solar Power in China and India: A Spatial Analysis of Technical Potential and the Cost of Deployment," Working Papers id:2807, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2807 Note: Institutional Papers

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    solar thermal power; greenhouse gas mitigation; abatement cost; electricity generation; technological; learning; energy economics; developing countries; India; technical potential; china; coal;

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